Low

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Low

In the context of general equities, this is a specific minimum limit required by a seller in execution an order ("I'll sell 50 with an eighth low."); implies a not-held limit order. Antithesis of top.

Low

The smallest price of a stock over a given period of time, especially when the price has first been reached. That is, when a stock's prices have dipped below the previous record for a given period of time, analysts and reporters say that prices have reached "a new low." This is generally considered a bearish sign, especially when other indicators are also bearish.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, for some caters, this resulted in feelings of lowness, "helplessness," and lack of acceptance of some behaviors; however, there was also evidence of positive changes in their personal and family relationships.
Following the lowness of the narrator's voice, the audience listened to the narrator's explanations about why he had to leave his lover, and simultaneously, they would have more sympathy for Tomoko's experience.
but also view poverty as a result of a lack or lowness of multiple resource variables.
This lowness was significant for the domain of physical role limitations (RP).
Its huge garden was blooming with multi-coloured flowers, archways, well- trimmed lowness.
Sen (1999) posited that "poverty must be seen as the deprivation of basic capabilities rather than merely as lowness of income, which is the standard criterion of identification of poverty.
In Development as Freedom (OUP 1999) he writes: 'poverty must be seen as the deprivation of basic capabilities rather than merely as lowness of income'.
Data were normalized by global, lowness, print-tip, and scaled normalization for data reliability.
A cultural correlate of dominance is authority, so lowness of pitch may be the objective acoustic trait underlying this subjective label.
It is analogous to the opportunistic, interest-driven use of the term "mob" by authoritarian regimes in description of anti-regime protests, though -- or perhaps because -- the term implies, as one scholar pointed out, "gullibility, fickleness, herd-prejudice, [and] lowness of state and habit.
A person affected with debility, lowness of spirits or melancholy.