loss

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Loss

The opposite of gain.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been hypothesized that when the mandible sustains fewer fractures, the dissipation of energy is reduced and more force is transmitted to the cranial vault, thereby resulting in a higher incidence of loss of consciousness.
However, when PTSD and depression were included in the analysis, the relationship between loss of consciousness and the physical health symptoms listed on the PHQ-15 disappeared (except for headache and heart pounding).
A loss of consciousness is not imperative and it is well documented that severe complications can occur in the absence of coma (Jennett, 1976; Binder, 1986; Berker, 1996).
A concussion is defined as a trauma-induced alteration in mental status that may or may not involve loss of consciousness.
A concussion is defined as head-trauma-induced alteration in mental status that may or may not involve loss of consciousness.
Unexplained loss of consciousness: Loss of consciousness remained unexplained after routine assessment and/or investigation.
Other attempts to define the severity of a mild head injury have included the development of diagnostic criteria for concussion, based on the length of time of a loss of consciousness, and in the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modifications (ICD-9-CM, 1979).
an acronym for head injury assessment (H = hit on head, E = emergency room visits, L = loss of consciousness, P = any problems?
The law and Cal/OSHA requires that employers record all injuries and illnesses on the job that result in death, days away from work, restricted work, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness.
The researchers followed more than 4,000 older adults aged 65 and older for 16 years and found that participants who had suffered a brain injury with loss of consciousness at some point in life did not have a higher risk for dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD) in older age than those who had not suffered TBI.
However you should still call 999 or visit an Emergency Department (A&E) for emergencies such as loss of consciousness, severe chest pain, serious accidents or serious loss of blood.
Flight attendants, pilots and passengers from Australia to the US, Germany to the UK, are all claiming that contaminated air has led to their short and long-term ill health, ranging from constant tremors and headaches to loss of consciousness.