Ground

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Ground

A customary unit of area approximately equivalent to 203 square meters. It is used in real estate transactions in some parts of India.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report found that wealthier countries show higher well-being levels; overall, the UAE's well-being performance is good but losing ground. The country is below global average when it comes to converting wealth into well-being, and of countries with a similar starting level of well-being, the United Arab Emirates is in the 3rd quartile of change.
LOSING GROUND: GT6 is a fine racer, but the franchise now needs to up its game
Photiades, was still in the lead in 2010 with a 51.9% market share, losing ground from 52.7% in 2009 and 54.9% in 2008.
Summary: Crude-oil futures briefly soared to above $108 a barrel Friday after a better-than-forecast US jobs report for March, while reports of anti-government forces losing ground in Libya added to geopolitical uncertainty about oil supplies.
<![CDATA[ Turkish PM's hostility to Israel could be a ploy to gain popularity for his party, which is losing ground, says Begin-Sadat Center's director.
Also losing ground was Royal Bank of Scotland ahead of its results today.
Stocks fell across the board at the opening with all 33 sectors on the TSE losing ground.
Titled, "Losing Ground: Foreclosures in the Subprime Market and Their Cost to Homeowners," the CRL study is the first comprehensive, nationwide review of millions of subprime mortgages originated from 1998 through the third quarter of 2006.
But the results also show the Lib Dems losing ground under Sir Menzies Campbell's leadership.
But the diet of passive one-way messages is quickly losing ground to the interactive online communications power of what are called "Web 2.0" technologies, including wilds, podcasts and blogs.
He is not worried about liberal religious forces reshaping American politics, but that is largely because Phillips sees the mainline Protestant (and Catholic) churches that might challenge the Religious Right as losing ground and membership.