loss

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Loss

The opposite of gain.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
DENBIGHSHIRE NOC - No change C gain 9, LD gain 1, PC gain 1, Ind lose 6, Lab lose 5.
Maybe getting more calcium or calcium-rich dairy foods will help you lose weight.
If this were the case, only one of the athletes might need to lose weight--the one with the higher percentage of body fat.
Homeowners who lose their vacation homes have two years and owners of real property used in their trade or business or held for investment have three years.
Several scholars have argued that black students lose more ground over the summer than white students because of their relatively worse home and neighborhood environments.
Since those who lose weight and keep it off on their own seem to have a higher success rate than those who use organized programs, another major arena for research in effective weight loss methods would be to better understand just what characteristics, both of the methods that work and of the people using them, lead to that success.
If politicians and journalists have lost their sense of moral proportion, must we, as citizens, lose ours?
"Telling people to eat less and exercise more might send them fleeing for the hills," he writes, "so the diet book authors and women's magazines search valiantly for some aspect of eating to blame, some way of telling people they can stuff their faces - and still lose weight." Intelligent, well-educated people will plunk down $25 for a book that claims you can lose weight by eating chocolate, or cutting out fat, or cutting out carbohydrates, or eating foods in certain combinations, or eating as much as you want of whatever you want.
Along with using the stationary bike, this approach helped him lose eight pounds.
However, although these fears are, I think, extreme, there is a different but related thought that I find convincing: it is the feeling that, if we lose the ability to imagine wondrous, unseen things, and to consider them as possibly real, we lose a delightful and very important capacity.
But even some ardent supporters of the Endangered Species Act say we can afford to lose some species.