Look

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Look

Used for listed equity securities. See: Picture.

Look

1. In equities, the price at which a dealer or broker is willing to buy or sell a security. See also: Bid-ask spread.

2. See: Quote.

look

A price and size quotation for a security. For example, a floor broker may ask for a look at General Motors.
References in periodicals archive ?
"You have to have a guy dedicated to looking at the machine after every shift, who looks at the hoses, the chamber, the shear blades, conveyer and loader so you can identify any potential problems.
"Now, post-Katrina, because the market has shifted so much in the last 60 to 90 days, companies are going back out and looking at policies that they already have on the books.
We're also looking at combining all of our battlefield Airmen, all of our Airmen that fight on the surface, security forces, terminal controllers, pararescue, a lot of the folks that we have living inside the Army system and living inside special operations systems, to look at a common schoolhouse and a common syllabus down at Moody AFB, Ga.
He had it all there in his pocket in one-dollar bills, and he kept taking it out and looking at it; and the sight of it gave him a queer feeling.
Our high-end consumers look to the star ratings and our mid-level consumers are looking at that one to three-star markets.
Since I'd once seen Nicky whack a guy over the head with a forty-pound dumbbell just for looking at him the wrong way, I figured it'd be a good idea to get on his good side.
Start looking at yourself more realistically and, soon, you'll learn to love yourself as "ideal."
I need to work on looking at the long term, not just what will happen tomorrow (tactical vs.
Are you looking at new work that lends itself to robotics?"
When a physician is looking at the image, his brain is not using statistics measures.
We're also seeing big changes in transport and handling systems, although that doesn't always mean a reduction in grammages because you're looking at the whole logistics cycle--it's really more of a total cost issue."