long

(redirected from longish)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Long

One who has bought a contract to establish a market position and who has not yet closed out this position through an offsetting sale; the opposite of short.

Long Position

The ownership of a security or derivative, or the state of having bought one or the other. A long position brings with it the right to coupon payments or dividends attached to the security or derivative. Informally, one who owns 100 shares of a stock is said to be "long 100 of the stock." Likewise, an investor who has bought (or holds) an option is said to be "long the option" because he/she has the right to exercise the option at a later date. See also: Short position, Close a position.

long

References in periodicals archive ?
The tight barrel/cylinder gap common on all FA single actions and the longish barrel combined to account for impressive velocities, as well.
I'm sure I was one of them myself: people who came to Africa for a longish period of time to sort of legitimize their blackness and then return with this boon.
In his late seventies and again in his eighties, Pope Pius XII (1939-1958), apparently hoping to prolong his already longish tenure, underwent treatments by a Swiss specialist in rejuvenation.
A number of poems are longer or longish, like "Grapes from the Village," "Maria-Grazia," "House of Commerce," and "Adventure" - all of them eminently readable.
We've found that a jug with longish threads works better than one with a short thread.
They have longish straights and don't demand such heavy braking and acceleration as Brands.
There's also a trace of olive oil in the texture, with a dry and longish finish.
I can't figure out whether it was a bold move against the conventions of fiction or some failure of nerve on the part of the author to maintain a young girl as the central character in a longish novel ostensibly about the great
But even with all this weighing in, the story on Capote is far from complete: Despite a longish section on his groundbreaking true-crime "nonfiction novel" In Cold Blood, cover age of Capote's writing career is modest, and his stint as a playwright in the early '50s is all but passed over.
Information of all sorts is lavishly provided (there is, for example, a longish section on publishing practice in Victorian Britain), the various contributors are not afraid to be provocative, and the questions are often challenging.
Each author is represented by a longish critique and a shortish quotation.
Later, the editors found they had to revise their view and do several longish pieces on Wines.