Nursing Home

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Nursing Home

A residential center for persons who are unable to accomplish some or all activities for daily living. Most residents of nursing homes are elderly or disabled. Many residents in the United States receive government health care aid such as Medicare or Medicaid. Nursing homes are heavily regulated because of their sensitive nature, especially if they accept government money.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dependent variables on indwelling urinary catheter use for quarters two, three, and four were created using the Quality Measures User's Manual formula of long-term care facility residents with an indwelling urinary catheter in the numerator and all residents in denominator (Abt Associates, Inc., 2004).
The use of indwelling urinary catheters among older residents in federally certified long-term care facilities in Arkansas in 2008 at admission was 16.8% among all new residents, and was significantly higher among newly admitted obese, older long-term care facility residents (19.4%).
To reduce the likelihood of an invasion-of-privacy claim resulting from a workplace search, a long-term care facility should establish and post a broad search policy stating that:
The resident is the most important person in the long-term care facility and must be protected from AROs.
Castle: I've learned a great deal from the nurse manager in our long-term care facility, Lily Lara, as well as other experts on falls, and from personal experience.
"It is imperative that a long-term care facility be aware of these regulations when seeking massage therapists as consultants, providers or staff.
The Episcopal Church Home, a 180-bed, not-for-profit long-term care facility in Rochester, New York, developed a program designed to address this issue.
Admissions questions asking a male resident about his wife and children; pictures on the wall showing only malefemale couples; a woman's lesbian partner questioned about her relationship to the resident when she visits; staff not trained to handle gender-variant residents; and the possibility of abuse and discrimination--all these factors can lead a lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) resident of a long-term care facility to feel depressed, isolated, unappreciated and unacknowledged.
Moving to a long-term care facility can provide a special challenge to a resident's sense of independence.

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