long

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Long

One who has bought a contract to establish a market position and who has not yet closed out this position through an offsetting sale; the opposite of short.

Long Position

The ownership of a security or derivative, or the state of having bought one or the other. A long position brings with it the right to coupon payments or dividends attached to the security or derivative. Informally, one who owns 100 shares of a stock is said to be "long 100 of the stock." Likewise, an investor who has bought (or holds) an option is said to be "long the option" because he/she has the right to exercise the option at a later date. See also: Short position, Close a position.

long

References in periodicals archive ?
There is no doubt our long-suffering supporters will be expecting more this time round.
The EU has, for once, shied away from imposing yet more regulation on long-suffering member countries.
In [1934's] Imitation of Life, [the long-suffering black character Delilah says], "I just want the biggest funeral Harlem's ever seen.
By DIG!'s conclusion, he has lost a long-suffering girlfriend ("Heroin makes him evil"), BJM's devoted manager of six years ("Anton is a great songwriter, ...
Invest wisely this summer or be prepared to risk the wrath of the long-suffering fans.
Arnold Schwarzenegger's victory in the California recall election came about because of a revolt by that state's long-suffering middle class.
Sir Mark Prescott's no doubt enormously long-suffering stable staff will be pounds 70,000 better off if the Heath House genius can pluck a Tote Cesarewitch winner out of the bag today.
CLASSIC Fawlty Towers clips such as Basil whacking his temperamental car with the branch of a tree or beating long-suffering waiter Manuel with a spoon, will soon be seen on mobile phones.
Poor Alex, 31, for whom the term 'long-suffering' could have been invented, flew home from their holiday in Malta, as soon as the news broke.
This week, there's more of the same when Mubbs (Ian Aspinall) fights to save a mother's life after a power cut plunges the hospital into chaos and the long-suffering Kath (Jan Pearson, pictured) pleads not guilty in court when the charge against her is reduced to assisted suicide.
To place the sterile and selfish sensuality of homosexuals on a par with the fecund and generous self-giving of parents makes a mockery of that quiet, long-suffering heroism known to many of us as Mom and Dad.
It's about time they gave the long-suffering customer a fair deal.