Lock

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Lock

Used in the context of general equities. Make a market both ways (bid andoffer) either on the bid, offering, or an in-between price only. Locking on the offering occurs to attract a seller, since the trader is willing to pay (and ask) the offering side when others only ask it. Locking on the bid side attracts buyers for similar reasons. Typically, the sell side requires a plus tick to comply with short sale rules.
References in classic literature ?
But at last "the fatal engine" closed upon the lock. Even to the last, one wretched sylph struggling to save the lock clung to it.
what will become of me?' And the lock answered her, and said:
The larger he locked up together; generally, but not always, in one of the drawers of the library table.
This the white-haired man told me was to be my apartment; and the inner door, which "for fear of accidents," he said, he would lock on the other side, was my limit inward.
But the door was very strong and firmly locked. There seemed no chance of getting out.
Be it as it may, we have private reasons for knowing that a tall figure in a white sheet did walk, at the most approved ghostly hours, around the Legree premises,--pass out the doors, glide about the house,--disappear at intervals, and, reappearing, pass up the silent stairway, into that fatal garret; and that, in the morning, the entry doors were all found shut and locked as firm as ever.
George said he never saw so much thoughtful sadness concentrated into one glance before, as when, at the lock, that young couple grasped the idea that, for the last two miles, they had been towing the wrong boat.
A servant came into the room to tell Adam that there was some strange noise coming from the locked room into which he had gone when he came in.
I have locked them and, in my opinion, they would be better kept locked for the present."
'Well, you know,' said the Deputy Lock, shrugging his shoulders with his hands in his pockets, and shaking his head in a sulkily ominous manner, 'the parish authorities down town will have it out of you, if you go on, you may take your Alfred David.'
Boxtel at first entertained an idea of stealing the key, but it soon occurred to him, not only that it would be exceedingly difficult to abstract it from her pocket, but also that, when she perceived her loss, she would not leave her room until the lock was changed, and then Boxtel's first theft would be useless.
He attempted to open the door only to find that it resisted his every effort--it was locked upon the outside.