Living Wage

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Living Wage

The lowest wage necessary for a person to be able to provide himself/herself with food, clothing and shelter. A living wage varies from place to place depending on an area's cost of living. A living wage may also bear only a rough resemblance to the minimum wage, which is the lowest wage a company may offer legally. Some jurisdictions, however, have mandated a living wage as the local minimum wage.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Finding ways to support and encourage employers to pay the living wage is a major part of that.
"It is fantastic to see more businesses and Labour-run councils in our region seeing the benefits of adopting the living wage, but it is important that we continue to demonstrate the value, both to employers and also to our region as a whole."
, hm "If employers agree to move to paying the Living Wage to their workforce, we will provide them with an incentive, offering them in the first year the money that government would receive in higher tax revenues.
"We say, yes, the community needs low-priced goods and high wages, but the community needs living wage jobs and healthcare.
The living wage rejects the notion that the dictates of the market should dominate workers' lives and livelihoods.
Their calculations also show that most of the gains from the living wage proposal would be offset by reductions iff these other redistributive programs.
Paying the Real Living Wage demonstrates how we value their contribution.
"We have the wrong kind of recovery with the wrong kind of jobs - we need to create far more living wage jobs, with decent hours and permanent contracts.
Both Martin (2001, 2006) and Levin-Waldman (2004, 2008) have previously analyzed determinants of the adoption of living wage legislation.
The living wage is defined as a wage sufficient for working families to pay for basic necessities, support the healthy development of their children, and participate fully in their communities without experiencing undue stress.
Rhys Moore, director of the Living Wage Foundation, said: "As the recovery continues it's vital that the proceeds of growth are properly shared.
Across the UK, 5.28 million people - 22% of the workforce - are paid below the living wage.