Living Wage

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Living Wage

The lowest wage necessary for a person to be able to provide himself/herself with food, clothing and shelter. A living wage varies from place to place depending on an area's cost of living. A living wage may also bear only a rough resemblance to the minimum wage, which is the lowest wage a company may offer legally. Some jurisdictions, however, have mandated a living wage as the local minimum wage.
References in periodicals archive ?
The highest share of people earning less than the living wage were found in Conwy and Powys (both 32%) and Monmouthshire (30%).
The TUC claim that some businesses can afford to pay the living wage, calculated by Centre for Research in Social Policy, but are refusing to do so - and the regional economy is suffering as a result.
Mr Miliband will promise that firms paying the Living Wage will get a year-long tax rebate of up to PS1,000 for every low-paid worker who gets a rise, if he wins the next election.
We must also challenge employers, by demanding that they pay living wages to their workers.
This means enforceable international agreements allowing workers the freedom to organize as well as putting teeth back into American labor law, it means cooperation between workers and middle-class reformers and consumers, and it means government action both on the national and international level to slow the free movement of goods produced by children or workers paid below a living wage (or not paid at all) in unhealthy conditions.
Vondracek said the South Austin Coalition will continue organizing residents around the idea of living wages, taking a specific look at the history of organized labor in black communities-which would be essential for workers in the neighborhood to gain bargaining power in the face of other retailers looking to locate in Austin.
However, in the case of living wages, a requirement is established that will inevitably increase costs.
The conclusion shows nearly eight in ten labor economists (79%) believe that a typical living wage law applied locally would cause employers to hire entry-level employees with greater skills or experience than the applicants they previously hired.
For example, the authors argue at length that because only a fraction of the work force in the firms affected by living wage proposals will be affected, total costs will be increased by only 1 or 2 percent--and that as a result, not only will there be no significant reduction in employment, but the extra cost will be absorbed out of profits rather than passed on in higher prices.
The annual living wage research report by KPMG, published today, estimates that 239,000 workers receive less than the living wage in the North East, which is one in every four workers - a number that rises to over one in three in places such as Darlington and Blaydon.
Despite a claim it may be treading on federal powers, the Los Angeles City Council voted tentatively Tuesday to extend its Living Wage Ordinance to the employees of contractors for major city tenants, including the airlines at LAX.
According to ACORN: "One of the most promising uses of Living Wage campaigns is to foster union organizing among low wage workers.