Typo

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Typo

An unintentional mistake in typing, short for "typographical error." In 1962, a typo in the code of the computer instructions for an unmanned satellite traveling to Venus allegedly caused the failure of the mission.
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However, with a conservative legislature and a Supreme Court leaning toward literal interpretation, it is not inconceivable that the General Assembly could vote to repeal the Medical Marijuana Amendment and have its actions upheld by this Supreme Court.
Significant differences among the groups were also found when the literal questions were added, and also when added inferential questions, it was observed that the total average of the sum of the questions was higher for inferential questions, suggesting lower performance for this type of question.
The operators that deal with such logical propositions are called neutrosophic literal operators.
l] are called literal subcomponents, or respectively literal sub-truths, literal sub-indeterminacies, and literal sub-falsehoods.
On the Literal Sense: Pablo de Santa Maria Remarks to Nicolas de Lira
La comparacion global entre las puntuaciones de burla, critica y literal mostro que, en el caso de las hiperboles, los participantes tendian a favorecer una interpretacion literal del enunciado, frente a las interpretaciones de burla o critica.
These literal translations would be considered "Chinglish" to most who understand both Chinese and English.
Literal meaning: The grub, soft and vulnerable as it is, can chew an entire oil palm tree down.
That is, Manning has chosen to switch his preferred mode of communication from the literal interpretation of an adopted landscape to a metaphorical interpretation of a landscape that is bred into his genetic code.
Washington, Mar 10 ( ANI ): A new linguistic study of how individuals interpret various types of utterances sheds more light on how literal and contextual meaning are distinguished.
The translation is extremely literal, sometimes leading to awkward phrasings.
Synopsis: Three in 10 Americans view the Bible as the literal word of God, similar to what Gallup has measured in the past two decades but down from the 1970s and 1980s.