listing department


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Listing Department

The department of a stock exchange responsible for ensuring compliance with listing requirements. These listing requirements mandate that every stock on the exchange have a certain market capitalization, number of shareholders, and/or revenue. Listing requirements exist to enforce stability on the exchange as much as possible. As such, the listing department decides which companies may be listed, which must be delisted, and even which are temporarily exempt from the listing requirements. The listing department is also called the stock list. See also: Listed company, C.

listing department

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Abdul Aziz al-Emadi, director, Listing Department of QSE, urged the companies to undertake IR in their core strategies to better ensure transparency.
Abdul Aziz al Emadi, Director, Listing Department of QSE, said, "Qatar Stock Exchange has been actively promoting IR for a number of years, we want to see our listed companies committed to improving the flow of information in the market because they are the corporate ambassadors for Qatar.
The applications shall be submitted the QSE Listing Department in its capacity as the competent party to receive offering/listing applications.
The transaction will help the buyer strengthen its positions in the FCL sector while complementing the global network of ECU-Line Group, one of its subsidiaries with 200 offices throughout 90 countries, Allcargo Logistics said Wednesday in a filing for the listing department of the National Stock Exchange of India.
Abdul Aziz Al Emadi, director of the listing department at the Middle East Investor Relations (ME-IR) Society, accepted the accolade on behalf of the Qatar Exchange (QE).
Yasuyuki Konuma, the TSE listing department's director of business development, has stated that the exchange is keen to increase institutional usage.
If you decide, as do many speakers, to state the purpose of your talk in this fashion: "I'm going to tell them what my organization does", you will then probably build your talk the way we used to create term papers: by making an outline of all the stuff your organization does, listing departments, throwing in some historical info, adding something about the publications you produce, maybe recalling some specific issues addressed by your group, and you will have, as one speaker described, "A nice, solid, informational presentation that I give all the time." (The nice, solid, excruciatingly boring presentation that we hear all the time?) This would be a talk developed from the perspective of the speaker.