link

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Link

A unit of length equivalent to 7.92 inches. It is used in the surveying of land.

LINK

see AUTOMATIC TELLER MACHINE.

link

A surveying measurement still seen in older deeds or in deeds using descriptions from earlier times.A link is 7.92 inches.See land measurement conversion.

References in periodicals archive ?
ACM curriculum 2001, 2008 and 2013 proposes linked list as major topic in courses such as fundamental of data structures, data structures and algorithms, parallel algorithms and system programming (Roberts et al., 1999).
For example, the following formula divides by 2 the sum of the linked amount plus the value in B 15 on the dependent workbook:
Two other neurodevelopmental disorders, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome, have also been linked with damage to the same area of chromosome 15.
An advantage of online vocabulary lists is that words in these lists are also linked to other related Web pages and vice versa.
One was epidemiologically linked to a case that had one of the unique fingerprints.
The main problem is that the authors do not take into consideration basic assumptions of classical test theory when concluding that any types of "linked items" have psychometric benefits.
To illustrate his point, Barabasi uses the famous game, "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon," in which the second-tier movie star can be linked with almost any other actor in a couple of simple steps.
According to the IRS, the new Website is directly linked to the agency's new focus.
Once it is fully operational, more than three million articles from thousands of journals will be linked through CrossRef and more than 500,000 articles will be added every year.
These items are referred to as "linked items." There are actually two types of linked items currently being used, hard-linked and soft-linked.
The results of a Norwegian study, which concluded that men were contracting breast cancer at twice the expected rate in those occupations with high EMF exposure, spurred the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to make breast cancer studies linked to EMF exposure a high priority in the early 1990s.
Imagine a cyberworld in which public information about every dance company, every choreographer, every support group, was linked into the Web--available at a click to anyone who cared to look.