line manager


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line manager

a manager who has direct AUTHORITY over other employees in the ORGANIZATION. They exercise authority down the CHAIN OF COMMAND shown in the ORGANIZATION CHART. Often the term is used to denote those managers who have direct authority over production or clerical employees at the base of the organization. See LINE AND STAFF, MANAGEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The challenges facing the line manager mesh with the theories in use of the postmodernist; the tasks of the staff manager are informed by the theories in use of the modernist.
There are also significant differences between supervisor and line manager perceptions and that of personnel specialists.
Brewster and Larsen (1992), Hoogn-doorn and Brewster (1992), Brewster and Soderstrom (1994) present evidence that HR role is increasingly assigned to line managers and that the extent of such assignment varies from country to country.
The first is that, while reliance on external coaches may be waning, interest in line managers who can coach is growing.
Senior sales executives say they are awaiting official notification of the closure but area line managers have been asked to inform their sales teams of the news.
Senior sales executives say they are awaiting official notification of the closure, but area line managers have been asked to inform their sales teams of the news.
Cigna UK HealthCare Benefits (UKHB) declared that it has introduced a toolkit , which will help line managers to handle employee absence and health issues.
Shelor had been the product line manager for top hammer equipment for the past six years.
She claims she was followed by her line manager as she walked to the toilet in a Cardiff pub, pushed against a wall and subjected to a sexual assault.
He said: "My line manager consistently and progressively undermined my work and used bullying tactics to supervise and manage the work I undertook.
A major factor blamed for contributing to this increasing trend is that many companies over-rely on structured ways to talk to staff, such as magazines and intranet sites, rather than face-to-face chats, and do not make best use of one of their most important communications assets - the line manager.