Lift

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Lift

An increase in securities prices, as shown by some economic indicator.

Lift

1. An increase in price.

2. An increase in the measure of some economic indicator.

3. See: Uptick.
References in classic literature ?
"Are you going to lift for The Shamrock?" asks Captain Hodgson.
You know he and she went up and down in those lifts without official help; you know also how smoothly and silently the lifts slide.
"I'm going to do two things: first, weigh my sack; and second, bet it that after you-all have lifted clean from the floor all the sacks of flour you-all are able, I'll put on two more sacks and lift the whole caboodle clean."
Starting back a step, Grace lifted her hands mechanically to her ears.
So I lifted the Watcher and sprang into the cave, having it in my mind to slay the wolf before he lifted up his head.
He had a vague idea that with such a force as the great kite straining at its leash, this might be used to lift to the altitude of the kite itself heavier articles.
Genevieve saw her lover's arms drop to his sides as his body lifted, went backward, and fell limply to the floor.
Her father put his hand on her hair, but she caught his wrist and lifted it carefully away, talking to him rapidly.
The second girl handed him the sword, but though he tried with all his strength he could not lift it.
When the chosen girls had all danced, the king lifted his hand.
She lifted her hand--not beckoning me to approach her, as before, but gently signing to me to remain where I stood.
And it was the nixt mornin', sure, jist as I was making up me mind whither it wouldn't be the purlite thing to sind a bit o' writin' to the widdy by way of a love-litter, when up com'd the delivery servant wid an illigant card, and he tould me that the name on it (for I niver could rade the copperplate printin on account of being lift handed) was all about Mounseer, the Count, A Goose, Look -- aisy, Maiter-di-dauns, and that the houl of the divilish lingo was the spalpeeny long name of the little ould furrener Frinchman as lived over the way.