Whole-Life Cost

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Whole-Life Cost

The total amount a company spends on an asset over its entire usable life. Examples of whole-life costs include planning, research, purchase price, and maintenance. Companies estimate the whole-life cost prior to purchasing a new asset to determine whether or not it will be cost effective. It is also called the life cycle cost.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tool that integrates system models with a genetic algorithm optimization solver minimizes the life-cycle cost by finding the design variables such as chilled-water and condenser piping diameters, chilled- and condenser water temperature differences, and chilled-water supply temperature.
InfoMaster LCCA supports optimal decision making by determining the best time to replace pipes based on the present value of total ownership costs (or equivalent uniform annual costs) and life-cycle cost alternatives as well as the optimal budget allocation for phased capital improvement projects.
The American Galvanizers Association relaunched the Life-Cycle Cost Calculator (LCCC) at lccc.
Utility costs and life-cycle cost assumptions are those used in the evaluation of energy conservation measures for Standard 90.
To do this, GAO worked with a firm experienced in preparing life-cycle cost estimates for major federal acquisitions and compared the Navy's cost estimating practices with the best practices in GAO's "Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide.
The life-cycle cost calculation it is possible to complete before initiation of production process, along life cycle or at the end of product life cycle.
Although far from perfect, this hypothetical life-cycle cost comparison clearly demonstrates the impact that energy efficiency can have over time.
Many agencies are investigating economic tools such as life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) that will help them choose the most cost-effective alternatives and communicate the value of those choices to the public.
If electricity is required, the full life-cycle cost of providing it in all locations must be factored into the economic feasibility estimate.
The three-day workshop will receive participation from procurement leaders from George Washington University and life-cycle cost analysis experts.
3 billion life-cycle cost estimate lacks timely and complete supporting data, because it does not contain the most current information from testing and evaluation nor does it provide sufficient information on how changing assumptions could affect costs.
The life-cycle cost of High Intensity PL products is now substantially lower than first generation products because of longer service life, and the use of less, but higher intensity material.