Liberalism

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Liberalism

The philosophy that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. It was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first section provides evidence in support of Morris's liberalistic concern for the rights of minorities.
We cannot help ourselves." Moreover, he points out that "there is much in the liberalistic theory which is good and true; for example, not to say more, the precepts of justice, truthfulness, sobriety, self-command, benevolence." The problem is not the principles of liberalism as such, but the invocation of these principles in an attempt "to supersede, to block out, religion." When that happens, Newman states, "we pronounce it [liberalism] to be evil." (17)
Although this type of liberalistic argument represented a strong trend in the press until the 1990s, there was variation in its visibility relative to other forms of alcohol regulation.
Before Molnar's piece came out, there were earlier valuative essays, not specifically designated as reconsiderations, for instance, Nancy Maveety's on "Liberalistic Order: The Work of Gottfried Dietze" (Fall 1989) and John W.
After all, Socialism was supposed to defend humans being exploited by the anarchistic and liberalistic forces of Capitalism.
Close personal contact with patient suffering, a strong liberalistic view of patient autonomy and values, and a revised notion of the professional's role feature time and again as justifications for involvement.
Entrenched behind the liberalistic phase of the freedom of teaching and research, the universities have balked every effort at reform which was repeatedly urged upon them by outside forces that wished to bring them more in line with modem social conditions.