Liberal

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Liberal

A person who believes that one ought to be able to do what one would like provided it does not hurt another person. Liberalism was conceived in the 19th century primarily as an economic and social philosophy espousing religious liberty, the free market, and capitalism. In the 20th century, it became associated with the left, especially in the United States, due to a concern for social justice. As a result, a liberal tends to favor regulation of private enterprise. However, adherents to what is sometimes called "19th-century liberalism" or "European liberalism" are presumably more amenable to the free market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequently, the 18th and 19th century liberalists trusted and propagated that market, if left alone with economic agents freely consenting to the price arbitrage, will ensure a prosperous and efficient society.
The book's first chapter, "The Animating Ideal," examines tensions between a realist and liberalist approach by exploring the intellectual foundation of humanitarian intervention.
Second, there is the finding that the gatekeepers we interviewed appear to adhere to the liberalist conceptions of the cultural discount theory.
Houston had helped found America's first Owenite community at Haverstraw, New York, in 1826-27; Underhill, later president of the Ohio Moral and Philosophical Society and publisher of the freethought Cleveland Liberalist, had briefly joined that community before moving to the Kendal Community in 1827-28.
The concept of security community is a step towards peace, it has been derived from the Liberalist school of thought; it is characterized by the absence of war and military.
The liberalist tradition is vulnerable in the struggle against the second evil.
There's a less psychological way of reading the Freudian tradition, in other words, a way that refuses the inaugural liberalist gesture of considering the psychic and the social as conceptually distinct categories.
Ironically, though, these comments were themselves intensely ideological, drawing on abstractions which are difficult to define ("Life"?), and informed by O'Faolain's own liberalist agenda; it is a point which Matthews appears to overlook.
"But, the main point is that in the last ten years, the UPA Government has generated a liberalist environment in the entire country," he added.
Aydin's investigation is rooted in realist and liberalist international relations theory.
The new principle gave birth to the liberalist or the idealist current, the first ideological orientation in International Relations.
The liberalist demanded that religion is kept out of things, as people should be judged based on their acts and not on whether they're Muslim or Christian.