Marriage

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Marriage

A legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.
References in periodicals archive ?
In one of our informal conversations with a group of young men in Martuni in 2009, we heard of a case showing that even for men it is not easy to practice levirate. We were told that one young man whose brother had died and whose mother wanted him to marry his brother's wife ran away from home to avoid this, because he was in love with another woman.
Then, because of the levirate law, she marries his brother, who's named Onan.
Levirate so far is a well-intended solution to the sudden disarray of a young widow and spares the problem of paying the bride price for her new husband because she already belongs to the family.
Customs like levirate and sororate, by which a widow lives with the younger brother of her husband and a man marries the younger sister of his wife, show that marriage is very much a relationship between families rather than between individuals.
The main causes of trouble families or relations were: poverty, remarriages, extramarital relations, polygamy (plural marriages), polygyny (The condition or practice of having more than one wife at one time), levirate (The levirate decrees a dead man's brother to be the widow's preferred marriage partner) and sororate (The sororate decrees the marriage of a man to his deceased wife's sister).
Chapter Five discusses "Point of View" or "focalization;' as in laws enjoining compassion for animals, laws of warfare, the priestly diagnosis orleprosy", and the designation of characters (including the levirate) and places.
Deuteronomy 25:5-10 describes the practice of "levirate marriage," known in Jewish law as yibbum, in which the brother of a man who died without children had an obligation to marry the latter's widow.
Weisberg, Levirate Marriage and the Family in Ancient Judaism (Waltham, Mass.: Brandeis University, 2009) 45-96.
In addition to the trauma of losing a loved one, widows in some regions face the possibility of widow inheritance, or levirate marriage, in which a widow is forced to marry the brother or another male relative of her deceased husband.
By sketching the (only) circumstance under which a widow in the 1970s may have considered the levirate, namely, when the brother of her late husband was married to a close sister of hers, Bell indicates the beginning of the demise of the levitate a few decades ago: 'In keeping with the demographic pressures generated by polygamy, one could expect a widowed woman to be subject to the levirate, but, although this is a male expectation, it is frequently flouted successfully by women' (Bell 1980:258).
She undertook a very risky action to force Judah and his sons to honor her husband by obeying the "brother-in-law" (Levirate) tradition.
The ancient Israelites regarded as very important their law of levirate, or 'brother-in-law' marriage; see notes on Deut.