Marriage

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Marriage

A legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, there are a number of marriages in the oldest generation of Warlpiri people alive at Yuendumu which came about through the levirate, however, I am not aware of a continuation of this practice by the younger generations.
The writer of the footnote was saying that God was more disturbed by Onan's refusal to carry out the Levirate law than because he "wasted his seed on the ground" in an unnatural act of contraception.
Namely, even if the defect in the levirate husband was not in existence at the time of the marriage, but only originated thereafter, it is necessary to assess her earlier mental state retroactively in order to determine whether, had she known at the time of her marriage of the condition that her prospective brother- in-law would later develop, she would not have consented to marry her first husband.
When wives acquired by levirate were excluded, the number of household head's nuptial wives was 2.
In earlier times, perhaps one of his brothers would have inherited Chief Ukwuegbu's wives, but by 1985 levirate had become very unusual, and Chief Ukwuegbu had no living brothers in any case.
104) The leading Talmudic precedent for this view is the ruling that brothers, whose mother converted to Judaism during pregnancy, are not included in the law of levirate marriage and halitzah but are, nevertheless, forbidden to marry each other's wives.
Not the sacrificial laws, surely, nor the detailed laws concerning kashrut, mixtures of wool and linen, and levirate marriage.
Third, subsidiarity is consistent with the biblical pattern that responsibility for justice and compassion begins with the family (Jacob and Levi; Levirate marriage, the right of redemption [Ruth and Boaz]).
With time she finds her own emotions becoming more and more the subject of her notes, such as her experiences during the birth and subsequent death of her first child and the jealousy she feels while adjusting to the ancient custom of levirate.
But is it possible -- and in the state of the evidence this can only be a speculative question -- that the father-in-law's actions represent the local survival of a form of levirate marriage of the kind practised in some earlier Near Eastern societies, and maintained, particularly among Jews (who had very close cultural ties to the Phoenicians) well into the mediaeval era?
In eastern Africa, the traditional custom of levirate marriage was once a major contributor to the spread of HIV.
The Levirate Custom of Inheriting Widows among the Supyire People of Mali: Theological Pointers for Christian Marriage.