assessment

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Related to lethality assessment: Domestic dispute

Assess

1. To estimate the value of a property, especially for property tax purposes. For example, a county may send an assessor to one's house to assess its value and base the property tax one owes on that assessment.

2. To decide the cost of something. For example, an insurance company may assess the damage of a house fire at $120,000 and agree to pay that much toward repairs. Alternatively, the government may assess that one owes $50,000 in income tax based upon one's income the previous year.

Tax Assessment

The determination of how much a person or company owes in taxes. One usually determines one's own tax assessment by declaring one's income and capital gains from the previous year and applying the methodology the government requires to arrive at the tax liability. The government has the right to audit any tax assessment.

assessment

(1) The official valuation of property for tax purposes. (2) A one-time charge made against property owners for each one's pro rata share of the expense of repairs or improvements to be enjoyed by all of them in common,such as a condo association assessment to replace a roof,or a local government assessment to pave a dirt road. (3) Determination of the value of property in a condemnation case.

References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, concerns were raised regarding the inconsistency of the various domestic violence risk or lethality assessments being submitted to courts around Arizona.
The combination of SSVs predicted Lethality Assessment with [R.sup.2] =.623.
The only instance when supervisors would assume the role of a consultant with Level-1 supervisees and a client at a high level of suicide lethality would be when the client's suicide lethality assessment is very clear-cut (e.g., the client says "I will kill myself tonight if I do not get help"), supervisees adhere to basic crisis management, and supervisors are conducting live supervision.
It is far easier to identify the benefits of integrated decision-making (cuing a response based on a lethality assessment, for example) than to identify all the potential flaws or drawbacks of such an action.
When designing the Lethality Assessment Program, the team discovered a startling statistic: In cases of intimate partner homicides, there had been previous law enforcement contact 50 percent of the time, but the victim only accessed services four percent of the time.
Lethality assessment and crisis intervention with persons presenting with suicidal ideation.