Lessor

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Lessor

An entity that leases an asset to another entity.

Lessor

The owner of land, a house, or other property who sells the right to use the property for a set period of time. Sometimes, this includes the right to develop land belonging to another, but normally it is the right to live on or use an already developed property. The contract governing a lessor's rights is a lease; it generally includes the lessee's right to use the property under certain conditions without undue interference from the lessor for the period of time described in the lease. In exchange, the lessee pays rent.

lessor

The owner of an asset who permits another party to use the asset under a lease. Compare lessee.

Lessor

One who rents property to another. In the case of real estate, the lessor is also known as the landlord.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aircraft was due to land in Sharjah on a certain date known to the lessors, primarily to undertake repair works and was due to enter a workshop for maintenance with a Maintenance Repair and Overhaul (MRO) provider.
Among the challenges aircraft lessors will need to navigate over the coming years include industry cyclicality, geopolitical risk, oil price volatility, competitive pressures on underwriting standards, funding and placing the delivery of large aircraft order books, residual value risk associated with older model planes, and rising interest rates.
Japanese-owned SMBC Aviation Capital is Asia's biggest lessor, with a fleet valued at $9.
An operating lease, put simply, is a lease where the lessor takes residual risk on the asset and rent is broadly based on the actual cost (including depreciation) and profit margin to the lessor, with the lessor taking back the asset at the end of the lease.
The lessor owns the car, unless the lessee options to buy it at the end-of-term or refinances the remaining amount.
SECURITY DEPOSITS: It's fairly common for a lease to require you to pay the lessor a security deposit.
The present value of lease rentals which the lessor will receive from the lessee does not exceed 90 per cent of the fair value of the asset.
While both the lessor and lessee are certainly aware that in reality there is n such thing as "free rent," a rent holiday can often be a mutually advantageous arrangement.
Many equipment lessors deluded themselves by thinking they were funding stable, predictable assets on a long-term basis (three or four years).
On the other hand, a uniform federal disclosure scheme for lease-purchase agreements that provides key information to consumers without causing a substantial compliance burden to lessors might prove beneficial, provided the various parties affected by such legislation can identify a genuine need for it.
Thus, the lessor uses a combination of its own funds and borrowed money to purchase the asset (requiring large capital outlays) that is then leased to another party.
A recent amendment to the New Jersey Sales and Use Tax Act may adversely affect the cash flow of lessors of taxable property by requiring the full payment of applicable sales tax at the time of entering into a lease and by shifting the burden of tax to the lessor.