Lessee

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Related to lessees: sublease

Lessee

An entity that leases an asset from another entity.

Lessee

A tenant; one who has obtained the right to use land, a house, and/or property from its owner. Sometimes, this includes the right to develop land belonging to another, but normally it is the right to live on an already developed property. The contract governing a lessee's rights is a lease; it generally includes the lessee's right to use the property under certain conditions without undue interference from the lessor for the period of time described in the lease. In exchange, the lessee pays rent.

lessee

A party using under lease an asset owned by another party. Compare lessor.

lessee

A tenant; the person or entity entitled to possession under a lease.

Lessee

One who rents property from another. In the case of real estate, the lessee is also known as the tenant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assets recorded by lessees are not the underlying assets themselves, but the right to use the underlying assets during the lease term.
It is also a system that is often plagued by misunderstandings, frequently because the lessee has not been given adequate information from their solicitor before buying.
From an accounting perspective a finance lease will often appear in the lessor's accounts as a loan owed by the lessee to the lessor, and in the lessee's accounts as an asset and debt due to the lessor for the rental and other payments due.
Lessees should be sensitive and let their neighbours know if there will be unusual noise from, say, DIY or workmen in the flat.
The reduction in net income, coupled with an increase in lease-related assets on lessees' balance sheets, means that lessees would likely exhibit a lower return on assets (ROA).
Accordingly the insurer can only use the Net of GST/HST method where the lessee can claim an ITC.
Some of these new protections for lessees are likely to increase the service charge costs whether the lessees want more protection or not,'' warned Mr Clark.
The present value of lease rentals which the lessor will receive from the lessee does not exceed 90 per cent of the fair value of the asset.
Previously, a cash basis lessor could defer income until payment was received, while an accrual basis lessee could deduct an amount for rent properly allocable to each year of the lease (even though the amount was not payable until a later year).
Once these are understood, the bargaining processes between lessors and lessees can be addressed.
Similarly, realization rates on residual values would be expected to experience decreases, magnified by the potential temporary increase in turn-in rates as a higher percentage of lessees choose to return vehicles at lease end rather than exercise the purchase option.