lead

(redirected from leading off)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Lead

Payment of a financial obligation earlier than is expected or required.

lead

A heavy metal shown to cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, seizures, and even death in children.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 3 to 4 million children had elevated lead levels in their blood in 1978. The number has now been reduced to several hundred thousand, but elevated lead levels in blood is still the leading environmentally induced illness in children.

Federal law that went into effect in 1996 requires sellers and landlords of properties built before 1978 (when lead-based paint became illegal) to do the following before any contract or lease becomes final:

1. Provide a copy of the EPA booklet, “Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home.”
2. Disclose any known information concerning lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.
3. Provide any records and reports on lead-based paint and/or lead-based paint hazards.
4. Include an attachment to the contract or lease (or language inserted in the lease itself) that includes a lead warning statement and confirms that the seller or landlord has complied with all notification requirements.
5. Provide home buyers a 10-day period to conduct a paint inspection or risk assessment for lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards.

References in periodicals archive ?
The ground floor has long corridors with the majority of the rooms leading off. Bedroom two has an ensuite shower room and bedroom three has the use of the family bathroom.
Curzon Street and minor roads leading off Curzon Street will be closed from 5am today until 5am on Monday.
In the final the boys lifted their game again, Barrett leading off in 26.43 followed by Dixon in 26.69.
The researchers put the spiders in a transparent box with dead-end tunnels leading off each side.
Here are my four leading candidates, leading off with one recently cited by the language maven William Safire in his New York Times Sunday language column:
Turning off the road, we arrive at an innocuous area with three dirt tracks leading off in different directions out of sight over the hill.