test

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Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
- Silver Spring, Maryland-based public health protection agency The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first warned Americans in May 2017 that lead tests manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics may provide inaccurate results for some children and adults in the US, and has made a commitment to continue to aggressively investigate the problem, the agency said.
In addition, the agency is continuing the investigation into the root cause of the inaccurate lead test results and working with the CDC on an independent analysis of Magellan Diagnostics' LeadCare System tests and BD collection tubes.
Lead test kits simply detect the presence of lead in a sample of lead paint and test for the reaction of lead with either rhodizonate ion or sulfide ion.
Therefore, for many children with EBLLs, this question was answered YES, while it would have been NO if the survey had been administered before the blood lead test.
for several violations of federal law, including marketing significantly modified versions of two of its blood lead testing systems without the FDA's required clearance or approval and failing to submit medical device reports to the agency after becoming aware of customer complaints involving discrepancies in blood lead test results.
But the identification of even one risk factor should trigger a blood lead test, according to the policy statement from the ACOG's Committee on Obstetric Practice.
* Results from the survey indicated that most of the children in the area should receive a blood lead test according to both state and CDC guidelines.
Of the 242 children, 32 had no lead test, 113 had a first but no follow-up test (17 overdue and 96 either not yet due or too old for follow-up), five had only elevated first tests (i.e., delayed because too young or extenuating circumstances), and 92 had two tests.
In Michigan, Medicaid pays $11 for a blood lead test, and private estimates range up to $30 per test.
The report indicates that in 2000, 9 percent of those tested had at least 1 blood lead test result greater than or equal to 10 mcg/dL.
From 1991 to 1994, 81% of young children enrolled in Medicaid did not receive a blood lead test despite longstanding requirements for screening in this high-risk group, the report said.