Competence

(redirected from language competence)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to language competence: Linguistic competence

Competence

Sufficient ability or fitness for one's needs. The necessary abilities to be qualified to achieve a certain goal or complete a project.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Competence

The ability to complete a project, make a product, or otherwise do what is required. Both individuals and companies have competence. For example, an engineer would not likely find a job as a nurse because it is outside his competence, that is, his ability to do the required work. Likewise, a dental office is unlikely to be hired to design a skyscraper.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
That was the second very telling experience that made me self-conscious about my language competence and how others would perceive me as a "nonnative" speaker of English.
Mock exams in this context are administered every semester following two broad aims: (a) to promote learners' awareness of their foreign language competence, and (b) to evaluate learners' language achievement in relation to the curriculum's linguistic goals.
Looking at the concrete case of selective secondary schools (Gymnasien) in the largest German federal state of Nordrhein-Westfalen, Rumlich sets out to measure the English language competences, EFL self-concept and motivation of students enrolled in CLIL programmes.
In addition, we investigated the impact of perceptions of instructors' language competence on students' English language anxiety, EMI attitudes, and motivation for taking EMI courses.
This indicates that they were aware of the importance of collaboration in developing their language competence. It is also an indication of emphasis on the productive skills particularly speaking as group work involves peer interaction.
The degree to which assessment reflects an accurate estimate of foreign language competence level is termed validity.
Deaf children can acquire two languages simultaneously when adult language models follow language allocation strategies where the amount of exposure to a written/spoken language is increased as the child first acquires visual language competence. ASL can function as a first language that supports the learning of written/spoken English as a second language.
This is absolutely in line with previous work in the field showing that sociable behavior highly depends on language competence and is usually strongly impaired in children with SLI (Botting and Conti-Ramsden 2000; ContiRamsden and Botting 2004; St Clair et al.
Errors, on the other hand, would be beyond self-correcting and are to be seen as failures in language competence.
In order to find this gap, students' perceived needs, their current language competence levels and necessities with regard to academic and target situations were assessed.
Students who enter Vytautas Magnus University have to take a diagnostic test in order to determine their level of the English language competence. Figure 3 reveals that the results of the diagnostic test contradict to students' general opinion that the Lithuanian secondary programme is sufficient for acquiring CEF Level B2 competence (see Fig.

Full browser ?