Competence

(redirected from language competence)
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Related to language competence: Linguistic competence

Competence

Sufficient ability or fitness for one's needs. The necessary abilities to be qualified to achieve a certain goal or complete a project.

Competence

The ability to complete a project, make a product, or otherwise do what is required. Both individuals and companies have competence. For example, an engineer would not likely find a job as a nurse because it is outside his competence, that is, his ability to do the required work. Likewise, a dental office is unlikely to be hired to design a skyscraper.
References in periodicals archive ?
Students with high perceptions of their English language competence may have greater control over their academic progress, whereas students with low perceptions of their English language competence tend to be more concerned with their personal deficiencies than with task accomplishment.
The final remarks underline the lack of sufficient language competence possessed by students in order that they might successfully pursue English study programmes at university.
born generational status and Spanish language competence were added to the regression equation and yielded an [R.
The fact that only the severity classification yielded significant associations is not surprising, given that this criterion tends to reflect more directly children's language competence.
Errors, on the other hand, would be beyond self-correcting and are to be seen as failures in language competence.
In order to find this gap, students' perceived needs, their current language competence levels and necessities with regard to academic and target situations were assessed.
This study used the descriptive research design as it described the respondents' characteristics in terms of educational qualification, attendance at seminars/workshops/conferences, teaching experience, and language competence.
These synchronies underpin the role that oral language competence plays in social cognition and social inferencing, and underline the overlap between childhood maltreatment (abuse and/or neglect) and impoverished language development (see Snow 2009).
Translating helps students enhance their native language competence by "discovering aspects of their own language in the process of studying another language--indeed, one of the best ways of studying one's own language is arguably by comparing it with another" (Harvey 56).
This "marketplace" of interaction is a linguistic market in which a particular language, language variety or legitimate competence is highly valued over any other types of language competence or language varieties.
He then specifies the necessary level of language competence at least in general terms: ".

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