machine code

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machine code

COMPUTER instructions written as a form of zero/one combinations which the computer can execute by activating off/on electrical pulses. All ‘higher level’ computer program languages like BASIC or COBOL have to be translated into machine code for use in a computer.
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References in classic literature ?
A person who understands both my language and your own.
A large part of one of Wundt's two vast volumes on language in his "Volkerpsychologie" is concerned with gesture-language.
So that was the way the Doctor came to know that animals had a language of their own and could talk to one another.
Surely there is not another language that is so slipshod and systemless, and so slippery and elusive to the grasp.
But that was later, and not because Latin was the language of the people, but because it was the language of the learned and of the monks, who were the chief people who wrote books.
However much we may admire the orator's occasional bursts of eloquence, the noblest written words are commonly as far behind or above the fleeting spoken language as the firmament with its stars is behind the clouds.
In the case of oratory, this is the function of the Political art and of the art of rhetoric: and so indeed the older poets make their characters speak the language of civic life; the poets of our time, the language of the rhetoricians.
They evidently understood neither the language of England nor of France.
Without effort, and quickly, practically with no teaching, he began picking up the language of the Ariel.
Sweet, with boundless contempt for my stupidity, would reply that it not only meant but obviously was the word Result, as no other Word containing that sound, and capable of making sense with the context, existed in any language spoken on earth.
Confusion of language of good and evil; this sign I give unto you as the sign of the state.
In language and literature the most general immediate result of the Conquest was to make of England a trilingual country, where Latin, French, and Anglo-Saxon were spoken separately side by side.