Landlord

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Landlord

A property owner who rents property to a tenant.

Landlord

A person who owns real estate and rents it to someone, allowing the renter to live and/or use the real estate in exchange for a fee. The fee is also called rent and is usually paid once per month. In exchange for the rent, the landlord is responsible for the basic upkeep of the property. For example, if the roof collapses, the landlord, rather than the renter, must pay for it. Landlords usually may not deduct the interest they pay on the mortgages of their properties from their taxable incomes, but the rent can provide a steady income with little or no actual work. A female landlord is called a landlady. See also: Passive income.

landlord

The owner of property rented to another. The landlord's interest is called a reversionary interest, while the tenant's interest is possessory.

References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, because of the prerogatives and obligations of landownership, true abandonment of chattels, i.e., the unilateral severance of one's ownership ties with an item of property, is quite exceptional.
One possible explanation lies in the relationship between forest cover and landownership. Both percent state land and percent federal land are positively correlated with tree canopy, and further analysis shows that mean percent tree canopy for these ownerships is higher than the average for the study area.
Correlating conceptions of stratified landownership in central Russia and Russian imperial theories of Siberia is a conceptual tour de force.
In all of this, he is led by an understanding that "gentry" ought not to be used as a synonym either for "lesser aristocracy" or "magistracy." Rather, he incorporates these and other characteristics into a six-point definition, seeing the gentry as: 1) a type of lesser nobility; 2) based on land and landownership (although encompassing other forms of property and open to men of "professional" rank); 3) socially gradated within itself; 4) relating closely to public authority; 5) exercising social control; and 6) having collective identity and interests (11).
To accomplish the extensive population surveys needed to determine the frankenia's distribution and abundance, Janssen had to identify landownership and get written permission to access land and collect data.
Third, if this argument is valid, it can further be hypothesised that the disparity between the rent payers and rent receivers, and even among rent receivers with different landownership, and the disparity between regions with different accumulation of public and private capital may not be reduced only with technological innovation within the agricultural sector through market.
In City Merchants' Landownership around Henley-on-Thames and the Paintings of Jan Siberechts', Laura Wortley discusses Siberechts' views of the area, none of which shows an individual house, unlike the Belsize picture, and considers what they may reveal about the possession of land there by a small group of City merchants.
According to the report,called Spotlight On Subsidies: Cereal Injustice Under the CAP in Britain, this will ``increase operating costs, stifle innovation,limit prospects for diversification, increase the risk of unsustainable debt,and create incentives for farmers to sink capital into landownership''.
The state of Hawaii is no slouch in the landownership department, either.
* Power to assemble land: Development cannot proceed rapidly and to a sensible plan if landownership is not united.
Round, focusing on questions of landownership and feudalism.
de Ste Croix ("Trials at Sparta," 1972, "The Helot Threat," 1972, and "Sparta's 'Foreign Policy,'" 1972), Stephen Hodkinson ("Spartiate Landownership and Inheritance," 1989, and "Social Order and the Conflict of Values in Classical Sparta," 1983), Robert Parker ("Religion in Public Life," 1989, a deft examination of the relation of Spartan royalty to divinity), Graham Shipley ("Perioecic Society," 1992), and Jean Ducat, as translated by Sam Coombes ("The Obligations of Helots," 1990) all contribute to a valuable expository account of Sparta.