Landlord

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Landlord

A property owner who rents property to a tenant.

Landlord

A person who owns real estate and rents it to someone, allowing the renter to live and/or use the real estate in exchange for a fee. The fee is also called rent and is usually paid once per month. In exchange for the rent, the landlord is responsible for the basic upkeep of the property. For example, if the roof collapses, the landlord, rather than the renter, must pay for it. Landlords usually may not deduct the interest they pay on the mortgages of their properties from their taxable incomes, but the rent can provide a steady income with little or no actual work. A female landlord is called a landlady. See also: Passive income.

landlord

The owner of property rented to another. The landlord's interest is called a reversionary interest, while the tenant's interest is possessory.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the parliamentary debate, conservatives and socialists both agreed that collective landownership could make the autonomy that derives from landownership available on a more widespread basis.
Viewed from the perspective of abandonment, property relationships are virtually impossible to sever unilaterally and landownership in particular is revealed to be an obligation-laden institution through which the law can both enforce and disseminate norms of ownership.
One possible explanation lies in the relationship between forest cover and landownership.
Guatemala's landownership system has its roots in the Spanish conquest, when land was taken from indigenous populations and given to the new colonizers.
When investing in Africa one should be careful so as not to antagonize local landownership rights.
We are trying to establish landownership and will be monitoring the situation over the weekend.
Gathering information on the complex issues of landownership, development partnerships, management structures, endowments, and academic mission requirements relating to development is a first step.
As for Albert Jay Nock, today's conservatives might see his views on family, landownership, and police as "Cultural Marxism.
Concerns, however, have arisen about administration and development procedures, the certification of rights to the land but not landownership, and lack of transparency concerning the boundaries of NCR land.
farm and ranchland now owned by someone other than the person who is farming it, according to the most recent landownership study that was conducted by the USDA.
Because of very low effective rates of taxation on locations, generally, the owners enjoy a net imputed or actual rent as an income stream associated with landownership.
She also brings in data from several other surveys carried out during and after the war, correlating, for example, landownership and income with political attitudes, in order to cross-examine her own qualitative findings.