land-use regulation

land-use regulation

A system of government-enforced restrictions on the development and uses of properties.Well-planned regulations should complement each other, although in the real world there is often overlapping of jurisdictions and conflicting laws. The primary vehicles of land-use regulation are

1. Federal and state government environmental protections for species, types of habitats, erosion control, siltation, etc.
2. Preemption by federal agencies for specific purposes, such as Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) restrictions on building heights near airports
3. Federal and state highway restrictions regarding signage and curb cuts
4. Federal and state tax incentives or tax burdens for particular uses of property
5. State health department regulations regarding sanitary waste disposal
6. State and local historic preservation laws
7. Local zoning ordinances
8. Local building codes
9. Local fire department regulations regarding safety issues
10. Subdivision restrictions

References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of a land-use regulation on property values can be positive or negative, whereas removing a land-use regulation from one property can be expected to have a positive effect.
The government is now in the process of preparing the land-use regulation rationalization plan.
The only direct experience that most people have with land-use regulation is with zoning ordinances.
According to The Conservation Easement Handbook, published by the Land Trust Alliance and Trust for Public Land, conservation easements occupy an appealing niche in the array of land-protection techniques--halfway between outright public or nonprofit ownership at one extreme and government land-use regulation at the other.
By the late 1960s, more than 78 percent of cities with populations greater than 10,000 had some form of land-use regulation. More than half had zoning ordinances, and nearly 45 percent had enacted subdivision regulation.
governmental entity that enacted the land-use regulation may choose to
Land-use regulations can lower real estate prices by imposing costs on property owners but may raise prices by restricting supply and generating amenities.
The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), adopted in 1968, requires local governments to adopt floodplain building regulations before residents are eligible to purchase food insurance.(2) The intrusion of the federal government into local land-use regulations has been justified by the nature of flooding - a low-probability, high-impact event - and the inadequate response by local governments to risks of that nature.
Greenwood has endorsed other land-use regulations, such as the eventual elimination of billboards and an ordinance requiring developers to plant trees and shrubs.
He made it clear that any recommendations by the GTF for large-scale federal acquisition, as had been proposed by the Wilderness Society, or regional land-use regulations would be unacceptable to Maine.
The two-year study by Rockefeller's Temporary Study Commission concluded (in 1970) that what was obvious had to be recognized: the Adirondack Park needed regional land-use regulations and the firm hand of a state-level planning authority to implement them.