Spear

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Spear

In auto sales, a tactic in which a salesperson speaks with a person away from the dealership site and offers an impossibly high price for a trade-in, provided the person comes to the dealership that same day to finalize the deal. The intent of a spear is to encourage the customer to come back to that dealership, at which time the salesperson will quote the real price for the trade-in.
References in periodicals archive ?
"In the exchange of fire, Lance Naik Sandeep Thapa attained martyrdom.
I heard my son Lance Seigfred (in long sleeves) telling his bestfriend in white 'Arce, mag pray tayo na tawagin ka, Lord tagai (bigyan nyo ng) award akong friend lord,'' wrote Egot.
Lance Sergeant Potts said: "I am very pleased and proud to receive the Cutlers' Sword.
When Lance left at the end of 2012, it didn't take long for my passion and drive to finally reach its potential and I applied to the Waikato Institute of Technology, focusing on that light at the end of the tunnel.
Adele said: "After Lance was first diagnosed his abilities were eroded to those of a five or six-year-old, but now he's like a nine-month-old baby in an adult's body.
He said: "Me and Lance after working through that distance through theamount of time we've been together, sometimes it takes something likea little bit of time apart to realise how fond you are of each other.
Archery - We're just supposed to believe that Lance became a master archer while no one was looking?
Emma, who has been fighting the company since June 21 when Lance passed away, said: "I don't have the strength to do this on my own any more.
Lance's teaching career began at the tender age of 18 as a junior teacher at Kingston Primary School in Tasmania.
Lance Corporal James McCue, 27, from Paisley, died on April 30, 2003.
Pacific Sand Lance (Ammodytes personatus; Orr and others 2015) are energy-rich schooling fish (Van Pelt and others 1997; Anthony and others 2000) that constitute important prey for a variety of marine fishes, birds, and mammals, including federally listed vulnerable species (Hobson 1986; Robards and others 1999a; Bertram and Kaiser 1993; Trites and others 2007; Hipfner and Greenwood 2008; Williams and Buck 2010).