Labor Intensive

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Labor Intensive

Describing an industry or sector in which it is difficult to produce a good or service without a large amount of labor. Labor intensive industries require either a large number of employees or a large number of hours worked by employees, or both, in order to be successful. Labor intensity may be quantified by taking a ratio of the cost of labor (i.e. wages and salaries) as a proportion of the total capital cost of producing the good or service. The higher the ratio, the higher the labor intensity. Labor intensive industries may control costs in bad economies by laying off workers. Examples of labor intensive industries include agriculture, mining, and hospitality.
References in periodicals archive ?
The UAE plans to build 50,000 new housing units in the next period, besides its involvement in a number of labour-intensive housing and real estate projects, according to Salman.
5 million finances for labour-intensive infrastructure projects in Aswan, Beheira, Giza and New Valley.
A group of MEPs from the European People's Party-European Democrats will shortly be writing to the EcoFin Council, asking it to extend member states' right to benefit from the reduced tax rates for labour-intensive services "after December 31, 2005".
Directive 1999/85/EC authorising member states to reduce VAT on labour-intensive services (small repairs, private housing renovations etc.
In October 1999, the Council a Directive authorising the application, on an experimental basis, of a reduced VAT rate on labour-intensive services.
The Member States nevertheless feel this commitment adds a measure of legal uncertainty to the application of reduced rates to labour-intensive services, (principally construction and cleaning services) beyond June 2004.
This implies a modification of the July proposal and extends the Directive on labour-intensive services.
These two activities and other labour-intensive activities, such as hairdressing and minor repair services, are featured in a specific Directive adopted in February 2000 for experimental purposes.
As announced in European Report 2712, the European Commission has proposed to allow Member States to apply a reduced rate of Value Added Tax (VAT) to specified labour-intensive services for another year (i.