kill

(redirected from killed with kindness)
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Kill

To cancel an order that has not yet been filled. See also: Fill-or-kill, Immediate-or-cancel.

kill

To halt a trade before sending a confirmation of it.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Both plots of A Woman Killed with Kindness explore gendered definitions of honour, examining issues of generosity and debt, female chastity, and male amity and enmity, but I wish to focus particularly on the main plot of Wendoll and the Frankfords as it offers a complex presentation of the causes and effects of adultery and constructions of openness, particularly female openness and the link between aural, oral, and sexual appetite.
Here, Comensoli discusses A Woman Killed With Kindness, Arden of Faversham, A Warning For Fair Women, A Yorkshire Tragedy, and Two Lamentable Tragedies, relating these works to shifts in economic prosperity during the period.
A play which responds superbly to Orlin's approach via social relationships, domestic activities, and the material structure of the house itself is Thomas Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness.
John Dexter's description of her set for A Woman Killed with Kindness at the Old Vic in 1971 - a platform on two levels with several walk-ons - as "a contained space in the middle of an open space" could be used to characterize many of Herbert's sets, from Arnold Wesker's The Kitchen and David Storey's Home (produced by the Court in 1959 and 1970, respectively) to Kurt Weill's Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (Metropolitan Opera, 1979) and Timon of Athens (Haymarket Theatre, 1988).
Among the best are A Woman Killed with Kindness, The Fair Maid of the West: Parts I and
Van Es wants to use Heywood as an example of how being a sharer could affect dramatic output, and he does this with an account of A Woman Killed with Kindness (139-40).
Rowland follows this with an examination of domestic and rural settings in How a Man May Choose a Good Wife from a Bad and A Woman Killed with Kindness that evince Heywood's unconventional manipulation of the burgeoning genre of domestic tragedy.
Instead of powerful, murderous Alice Arden, we find versions of Griselda such as the wife in A Yorkshire Tragedy and Anne Frankford in Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness (printed 1607).
But particularly fresh and original is her reading of A Woman Killed with Kindness, where she speaks of the domestication of justice, that is, of the private enactment of justice carried out within the household so as not to violate publicly the family's code of honor.
In their treatments of Holbein's sketch of Thomas More's family and Thomas Heywood's play A Woman Killed with Kindness, Felicity Riddy and Carol Mejia-LaPerle demonstrate the varieties of negotiated authority wives and daughters possessed through speech and mere presence.
The 16th Century writer and actor was a contemporary of Shakespearebut today about the only play of his still performed - and that rarely --is A Woman Killed With Kindness.