KP

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Related to keratic precipitates: keratitis, uveitis

KP

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for KOREA, DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

KP

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the People's Democratic Republic of Korea (North Korea). This is the code used in international transactions to and from North Korean bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for North Korea. This is used as an international standard for shipping to North Korea. Each province and special city has its own code with the prefix "KP." For example, the code for Pyongyang is ISO 3166-2:KP-PYO.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Classic sarcoid associated anterior uveitis may present either as acute iridocyclitis, which is mostly seen in Lofgren's syndrome, or as a chronic granulomatous uveitis with mutton-fat keratic precipitates [2].
Ocular findings and complications in 67 eyes clinically diagnosed with herpetic anterior uveitis Findings/complications Number (%) of eyes Granulomatous keratic precipitates 55 (82.2%) Corneal involvement 42 (62.6%) Iris atrophy [+ or -] transillumination 28 (41.7%) Transient IOP elevation 27 (40.2%) Pupil distortion without synechia 24 (35.8%) Posterior synechia 9 (13.4%) Permanent IOP elevation 8 (11.9%) Posterior subcapsular cataract 7 (10.4%) IOP: Intraocular pressure Table 2.
(5) The most common ocular manifestation is uveitis, with the posterior form being more common than the anterior form, the latter of which normally appears as an iridocyclitis associated with classic, granulomatous, mutton-fat keratic precipitates, hypopyon and posterior synechiae.
(5,9,10,11) Accordingly, cases exhibiting typically unilateral, chronic, low-grade anterior chamber reaction with varying degrees of vitreous opacity, widespread small- or medium-sized keratic precipitates (KP) in the corneal epithelium, diffuse iris atrophy and/or heterochromia but without acute exacerbations, posterior synechiae or cystoid macular edema were clinically diagnosed with FUS.
In general, where there is unilaterally raised IOP, it is important to think of inflammation as a possible underlying cause, and so careful examination of the anterior chamber for evidence of cells/flare, old keratic precipitates (Figure 4) and posterior synechiae is very useful.
Evaluation of corneal endothelium and keratic precipitates by specular microscopy in anterior uveitis.
At the slit lamp, are there signs of inflammation in the anterior segment (ciliary injection, keratic precipitates, aqueous flare and cells) that might suggest an inflammatory condition?