company

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Company

A proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or other form of enterprise that engages in business.

Company

Any organization that engages in business. There are many different structures a company can have, depending primarily on tax considerations and the type of business it does. Among some of the more prominent examples are a sole proprietorship, where an individual works on his/her own and all income is reported as personal income; a partnership, where two or more people create an organization partially distinct from each and where each partner has his/her own role; and a corporation, which is separate and distinct from its owners and is often a legally recognized person. See also: Limited liability company, Publicly-traded company.

company

see JOINT-STOCK COMPANY.

company

see FIRM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keeping company on stage with the tenors and sopranos is the awardwinning choir Cor CF1 and accompanist Jeff Howard.
When Long was served with the citation he expressed the greatest astonishment, and said he thought the respondent was a single woman, and said he had been keeping company with her for two years, and had intended marrying her in due course.
She is always worried about her father doing drugs and keeping company with drug dealers, but she is more worried about what her father will do to himself when left on his own to deal with his depression.
Cadw Cwmni gyda John Hardy (Keeping Company with John Hardy) goes out on S4C at 9.30pm tonight
Meanwhile, AnnaBeth faces a possible health crisis and turns to Zoe; and Wade gets himself in hot water by keeping company with women who aren't single.
(Graywolf Press, 2008) and author, in the U K, of Soul Keeping Company:
MIDLAND bosses have been warned they are putting themselves at risk by not having adequate policies for keeping company drivers safe during adverse weather.
The ministry also said that there had been inadequate guarantees on keeping company plants open, potentially threatening jobs.
When it came to keeping company, 44 percent of people preferred drinking with their partner, while a further third liked to catch up with theirriends.