Justice

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Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in periodicals archive ?
Casto, The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth 51-52 (1995); Wythe Holt, "To Establish Justice": Politics, the Judiciary Act of 1789, and the Invention of the Federal Courts, 1989 Duke L.
The analysis that follows is drawn from a data-base consisting of every judicial citation in the published reasons of the SCC since January l, 2000, a period which coincides with the McLachlin Chief Justiceship.
The full data-point expansion applies only to the last three Chief Justiceships, and is under way for the Laskin Court.
The chief justiceship of Charles Evans Hughes, 1930-1941.
55) It had provided an effective root-and-branch argument in 1641, for to take away all of the bishops' "secular" powers entailed not simply the forbidding them civil offices such as seats in Parliament and justiceships of the peace but also the removal of those coercive powers and physical punishments that they had wielded as part of their ostensibly "spiritual" functions.
On the Court's activities under the chief justiceships of Warren Burger and William Rehnquist, see generally Gerhardt, supra note 139.
Casto, The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth 222-38 (1995) (detailing the methods of constitutional interpretation employed by the early Court).
Part of the University of South Carolina Press series on the Chief Justiceships of the United States Supreme Court, Division and Discord admirably describes the justices and the cases of the Stone (1941-46) and Vinson (1946-53) Courts, (3) emphasizing it was an era of transition from the old order to the Warren Court.
Castro, The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth 178 (1995), but most commentators mark the 1793 letter as the recognized end of the Supreme Court's advisory role.