Justice

(redirected from Justices)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Justices: Associate justices

Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in classic literature ?
Mrs Western said, "she knew the law much better; that she had known servants very severely punished for affronting their masters;" and then named a certain justice of the peace in London, "who," she said, "would commit a servant to Bridewell at any time when a master or mistress desired it.
Even justices of the peace are to be appointed by the legislature.
The magistrate in whom the whole executive power resides cannot of himself make a law, though he can put a negative on every law; nor administer justice in person, though he has the appointment of those who do administer it.
I remember--I remember," said Chief Justice Oliver to himself, "when his present most sacred Majesty was proclaimed.
It did not occur to the chief justice that nothing but the most grievous tyranny could so soon have changed the people's hearts.
As the chief justice lingered an instant at the door a trumpet sounded within, and the regiment came clattering forth and galloped down the street.
thought the chief justice, with somewhat of an old Puritan feeling in his breast.
For the practicability of his ideas has nothing to do with their truth; and the highest thoughts to which he attains may be truly said to bear the greatest "marks of design"--justice more than the external frame-work of the State, the idea of good more than justice.
He told me there was no occasion to go before the justice now, I was at liberty to go where I pleased; and so, calling to the constable, told him he might let me go, for I was discharged.
tis a mistake, sir; I must carry her before a justice now, whether you think well of it or not.
I think he was a corn-handler), and a man of good sense, stood to his business, would not discharge me without going to a justice of the peace; and I insisted upon it too.
The place of justice is an hallowed place; and therefore not only the bench, but the foot-place; and precincts and purprise thereof, ought to be preserved without scandal and corruption.