Law of the Soil

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Law of the Soil

A citizenship law stating that all or nearly all persons born in the physical jurisdiction of a state are citizens of that state. That is, under the law of the soil, the citizenship of one's parents is irrelevant. What matters is where one is born. The United States is a major example of a country abiding by law of the soil. Some countries also follow the law of blood in addition to the law of the soil.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Constitution, which grants citizenship on the jus soli basis, is driving birth tourism to the U.
75) In any event, the links of ancestry or birthplace which underlie jus sanguinis and jus soli citizenship have been uniformly found sufficient to meet any effectiveness requirement that may exist under international law.
In addition, by 1874 Congress had extended the Constitution and all laws that were not locally inapplicable to the colonial territories, including the Fourteenth Amendment and the right to jus soli or birthright citizenship (Revised Statutes, [section]1891).
Much like jus soli and jus sanguinis use land and blood to represent the deeper and intangible kinds of qualities that a society deems central to citizenliness, temporal rules of citizenship use time in an analogic fashion.
Although jus soli and jus sanguinis cater to the political interests of immigrant and emigrant communities (Castles and Davidson 2000), open borders pose irresolvable contradictions with respect to both citizenship principles.
The doctrine of jus soli was not contemplated by the Congress and is inconsistent with the record of debates preceding the passage of the 14th Amendment's citizenship clause.
Contents Introduction Historical Development Jus Soli Doctrine Before the Fourteenth Amendment The Fourteenth Amendment and the Civil Rights Act of 1866 United States v.
Chapter Five discusses debates over what determined citizenship--place of birth, jus soli, or the fact of being born to French parents, jus sanguinis--and how it related to the hierarchy within the family.
This is described by the Latin phrase jus soli, which is translated as "right of the soil.
Italy's citizenship laws are moving towards jus soli for migrants to Italy and to accommodate dual citizenship for people of Italian origin living abroad.
Most EU countries have modified their nationality codes to give stronger weight to the jus soli in countries that have traditionally emphasized jus sanguinis.