Law of Blood

(redirected from jus sanguinis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to jus sanguinis: denaturalization

Law of Blood

A citizenship law stating that all or nearly all persons born to citizens of a given state are themselves citizen of that state, regardless of where they were born. For example, one with a parent who has been a U.S. citizen for one year is a citizen of the U.S., regardless of where one was born. Some countries (including the United States) also follow the law of the soil in addition to the law of blood.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The third and possibly most substantively influential source of pressure for the reform of the nationality laws that regulated family-based immigration, naturalization, and jus sanguinis citizenship was women's organizations' sustained campaign for gender equality during the 1920s and 1930s.
At that time, the [section] 4 of the nationality law, which originally contained only the jus sanguinis principle for German descendants, was amended with the paragraph:
In his view, an expansive, assimilationist understanding of the French nation led to the adoption of jus soli for second-generation immigrants, whereas an ethnocultural understanding of the nation has supported jus sanguinis in Germany.
Nonetheless, the differences between the legitimacy and citizenship status of children fathered by American soldiers in England circa 1945, Japan circa 1947> and Vietnam circa 1968 lay not just in the private choices of individuals entangled by war, but also-and significantly-in the official race-based marriage and fraternization policies of the United States military and jus sanguinis citizenship laws enacted by Congress.
Further, Colombia is one of the rare jus sanguinis nations in the Western Hemisphere, complicating the determination of who is a citizen of Colombia.
Rather, they choose to pervert the 1913 German citizenship law (Reichs- und Staatsangehorigkeitsgesetz) and the principle of jus sanguinis.
With restrictions on jus sanguinis in many countries in the region, it is also possible for second-generation emigrants (the children born in the United States) to lack citizenship in the parents' country, even if the parents' citizenship status there is secure.
161) The Court went on to reiterate that this guarantee of jus sanguinis nationality was present in Haitian Constitutions spanning more than a century.
Given the unchallenged orthodoxy of jus sanguinis in both countries, a relatively low rate of naturalization is to be expected.
Thus, Cheney-Lippold claims, the target becomes what he calls jus algoritmi, which, unlike jus soli and jus sanguinis, is not ordained and stable.
35) In jus sanguinis systems, as Ayelet Shachar notes, "the offspring of an emigrant parent gains automatic citizenship in the parent's country of origin, even where the family has severed all effective ties to the society that they have left behind.