Law of Blood

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Related to jus sanguinis: denaturalization

Law of Blood

A citizenship law stating that all or nearly all persons born to citizens of a given state are themselves citizen of that state, regardless of where they were born. For example, one with a parent who has been a U.S. citizen for one year is a citizen of the U.S., regardless of where one was born. Some countries (including the United States) also follow the law of the soil in addition to the law of blood.
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(87) Domestic nationality legislation varies between conferring nationality based on the jus soli (birth within a particular country), the jus sanguinis (blood relationship), and hybrid forms (combining elements of jus soli and jus sanguinis with varying emphasis on each element).
A few years after Rives wrote his letter to the American consul in Samoa, John Bassett Moore, a towering figure in international law--and one-time secretary to the Conference on Samoan Affairs--reported and summarized the laws governing jus sanguinis citizenship.
In this sense, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder said in his Declaration of Government in November 1998, that the national confidence is not based on the traditions of a jus sanguinis, created in the era of the emperor William II, but on the self-confidence of our democracy.
Out of concern for the influx of the migrant poor (also 'Germans') from neighboring states, they adopted jus sanguinis as the principle of transmission of state membership (Brubaker, 1992:64-71).
(303) But the marriage and legitimation requirements in the jus sanguinis citizenship statute-by then recodified in the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act (304)--continued to serve as a race-salient limitation on the recognition of American soldiers' foreign-born children as citizens.
The notable exception is the Dominican Republic, which recently changed from a jus soli regime to jus sanguinis. (65) "Hundreds of thousands" of stateless persons are believed to reside there as a result of discriminatory birth registration practices against persons of Haitian descent.
Indeed, despite its large foreign population Germany continued to base citizenship on jus sanguinis (community of descent) as codified in its 1913 Citizenship Law rather than on jus soli (place of birth).
In fact, by categorically declaring that the Philippines hereby adopts the generally accepted principles of international law as part of the law of the land, the Constitution itself lays its door open for a class of citizenship not necessary based on jus sanguinis. The phrase hereby adopts clearly means no enabling law from Congress is needed to make those principles part of our laws.
In this circumstance, the nationality of the child would depend upon rules of citizenship by descent, jus sanguinis, of that parent's nation.
Rather, they choose to pervert the 1913 German citizenship law (Reichs- und Staatsangehorigkeitsgesetz) and the principle of jus sanguinis. In a circular of of a county REP parliamentary group the party writes: So far, the jus sanguinis principle has ensured that the character and identity of our people have been preserved at least to some extent.
Two general legal bases for state citizenship exist: jus sanguinis and jus soli.(93) Germany adheres to the former.(94) Accordingly, German state citizenship depends on the citizenship of one's parents rather than on the place of one's birth.(95) The basis for Germany's citizenship policies is its historical self-perception that it is not a land of classical immigration.(96) This citizenship model distinguishes Germany from "traditional" countries of immigration, such as the United States and Canada, which base citizenship on the jus soli principle.
Sereno said only eight of 189 countries use blood relationship or jus sanguinis as the sole basis for determining citizenship.