Federalism

(redirected from judicial review)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Federalism

A political system in which the central government has certain, enumerated powers, and other government responsibilities are delegated to lower levels of government. For example, a federalist system may designate the central government to handle monetary policy and foreign affairs, but delegate most other matters to the provinces or states. Examples of federalist countries include the United States and Canada.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
It accurately clarified the law on the judicial review power of the civil High Court and the limits of the jurisdiction of the shariah courts.
But allotment holders say their application for a judicial review has been filed and they expect to hear whether it will go ahead "any day now."
| Carl Sargeant's widow Bernie, pictured with son Jack, has asked for a judicial review into the legality of the in-house inquiry
The timetable for the investigation will be updated once the judicial review claim has been determined.
Prompted by these recent cases on the procedural law of judicial review, I will, in this article, set out considerations courts should bear in mind when updating the procedural law of judicial review of administrative action.
Mayor of London Sadiq Khan also said he had instructed counsel over the possibility of a judicial review of the decision.
The so-called public/private divide features throughout the law and scholarship on judicial review, cleaving public and private bodies, functions, interests, remedies and law.
"We feel we have no option than to seek a judicial review and are appealing for the public to support us in this.
The last time Sisu applied for a judicial review against Coventry City Council, the judge handed down the judgment the following day.
It interpreted its expanded power of judicial review as a duty that it cannot abdicate.
To certain moral ideals?" In Judicial Review in an Objective Legal System, Tara Smith, philosopher of law and professor at the University of Texas at Austin, provides fresh new answers to these long-standing questions.

Full browser ?