judgment

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Judgment

An order from a judge or jury to pay a certain amount of money. Judgments usually come after a lawsuit or a criminal conviction. For example, if a company is sued and found liable, it may receive a judgment for, say, $1 million, which it must pay to the plaintiff. Also, if one is convicted of theft, one may be ordered to repay what one has stolen. See also: Out-of-Court Settlement.

judgment

An order of a court.

References in classic literature ?
But, as it happened, scarcely had Phoebe's eyes rested again on the Judge's countenance than all its ugly sternness vanished; and she found herself quite overpowered by the sultry, dog-day heat, as it were, of benevolence, which this excellent man diffused out of his great heart into the surrounding atmosphere,--very much like a serpent, which, as a preliminary to fascination, is said to fill the air with his peculiar odor.
JUDGES ought to remember, that their office is jus dicere, and not jus dare; to interpret law, and not to make law, or give law.
The Judge was struck with amazement at the language of Don Quixote, whom he scrutinized very carefully, no less astonished by his figure than by his talk; and before he could find words to answer him he had a fresh surprise, when he saw opposite to him Luscinda, Dorothea, and Zoraida, who, having heard of the new guests and of the beauty of the young lady, had come to see her and welcome her; Don Fernando, Cardenio, and the curate, however, greeted him in a more intelligible and polished style.
When he got out the new judge said he was a-going to make a man of him.
Passepartout was getting nervous, for the hands on the face of the big clock over the judge seemed to go around with terrible rapidity.
But the Judge said he never had summed up before; So the Snark undertook it instead, And summed it so well that it came to far more Than the Witnesses ever had said!
“You are of opinion, Judge Temple, that a man is to be qualified by nature and education to do only one thing well, whereas I know that genius will supply the place of learning, and that a certain sort of man can do anything and everything.”
The Judge somehow failed to notice them, while the Prosecuting Attorney and Patsy's attorney shied off from them gracefully.
"We'll make a good Republican out of you yet," said Judge Blount.
This being done, a gentleman in black, who sat below the judge, proceeded to call over the names of the jury; and after a great deal of bawling, it was discovered that only ten special jurymen were present.
Then he and Judge Scott, revolvers in hand, cautiously descended.
He had travelled too often with the Judge not to know the sensation of riding in a baggage car.

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