Jitney

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Jitney

1. An illegal act in which two or more investors buy and sell the same security at pre-arranged, agreed-upon prices. This directly results in neither profit nor loss for the investor, but creates the impression that the security is undergoing heavy trading, which could drive up the price or generate unwarranted interest.

2. A situation in which a broker who is a floor member conducts a transaction on behalf of a broker who is not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having lasted just 90 minutes in its first incarnation, Jitney is now a full-length drama that has attracted rave reviews everywhere the play has made a stop.
And in many ways, the current success of Jitney is indicative of the numerous paradoxes that seem to swirl around the work and persona of a man who is, arguably, America's greatest living playwright.
In light of KMR's analysis, a property rights framework that encourages jitneys but also gives some exclusivity to the bus anchor is called for.
jitney experience of 1914-1916, the mixed record of recent transit deregulation (here and abroad), and also jitney operations in various Third World cities.
We proceed by first examining four case studies of transit markets with deficient property rights: the jitney episode in the United States, 1914 to 1916; jitneys and route associations in less-developed countries (LDCs); illegal jitneys in New York City; and the British experience of bus privatization and deregulation.
Jitneys charging a nickel per ride picked up waiting passengers along the routes of the electric streetcars.
They have tried to force the independent jitneys and shabby taxis that glut traffic to meet minimum safety standards; they are cracking down on theft of water and electricity, and are trying to enforce patents and copyrights.
In many places in America, it is politically incorrect to build a church in a residential neighborhood, to own a pistol, to have oral sex in your own bedroom, to carry paying passengers in an unlicensed jitney, to braid hair for money, to cut down a tree in your own backyard.
Wilson first used this revision strategy with The Piano Lesson (1995) and decided to employ it again for the 1996 version of his play Jitney, originally written in 1979.
They have good jitney service, because it's dictated by the users.
From those laws LTFRB cracks down on overcharging and other breaches by jitney, taxi, and bus services, even 'colorum' or unlicensed public transports.