Jingle

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Jingle

In marketing, a short song with lyrics intended to become "stuck in one's head." The jingle emphasizes the quality, price, and/or desirability of a product. Jingles evolved gradually, but originated with the invention of the radio in the 20th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
From their line of soft, jingly toys perfect for little hands that are just learning to swat and grasp to their imaginative activity toys with pieces that rattle and spin, Infantino's creators live up to the motto that they "think like babies."
John Fitzgerald Kennedy: "Oh, my rank, dented, jingly fez!"
Something about them suits a current need, with commercial radio so jingly and dead and Dylan himself doing the music for Victoria's Secret lingerie ads.
The use of the wood block and resonant and jingly metals enhances the Oriental flavor of the music.
The following lessons are part of the unit: "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse": A Deeper Shade of Purple; "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse": All Things Purple; "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse": Jingly Coins; "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse": Nifty Disguises; and "Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse": Safe Bike Behavior.
It is my impression that students need to learn playfulness with language before they start writing their own poems and lapse into jingly rhyme or cliche.
Terstall underlines the commercialization theme with jingly elevator music and with so much rampant product placement -- characters all wear trendy clothing and there's barely a shot without a strategically placed iMac or Smart Car -- that the sponsor list runs longer than the tech credits.
"The pentameter line in particular seems capable of accommodating almost any syntactical arrangement, and the serious poet will avoid relying on the more common ones." Internal rhyme (i.e., a rhyme within a single line) "sound[s] too jingly," at least to Steele's ear; but "commonplace rhymes are not inevitably bad" (Steele's discussion of the history of rhyme is fascinating.) A common word followed by an uncommon one, Steele avers, is a good strategy; congruent monosyllabic and multisyllabic lines also make for "interesting counterpoints." "Complexity of technique" he writes, "is not invariably an advantage." But perhaps Steele's most important bit of advice is his quarrel with the belief, put forward by T.
In these poems, original and poetic lines are occasionally encountered, but for the most part they are repetitious, jingly, derivative, and unattractive.
reward in Hell." These are frightening propositions, and they are done up in the sort of jingly Dutch rhymes that must have lodged themselves in the head of any Dutch reader.
For other jingly sounds, you can make hand bells with 12-inch lengths of 1/2-inch dowel and 6 medium or 12 small bells and 1/4-inch eye screws.
She expected a twinkly, jingly explosion of fun: a seat on Santa's knee, snow, music, elves and sweets.