jeopardy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to jeopardy: Wheel of fortune

jeopardy

(1) Danger,hazard,peril.Mortgaged property is said to be in jeopardy because it might be taken by foreclosure.(2) Subjected to the possibility of criminal punishment,including fines.The constitutional protection against double jeopardy has been held to apply to fines,such as might be levied against a company for violation of housing discrimination laws.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if constitutional double jeopardy did not bar the second trial, Campbell contends that it was barred by Code
But now it has become the second successful prosecution since the ending of the double jeopardy rule.
Ljiljana Mijovic, a professor at the Law Faculty of Banja Luka and a former judge at the European Court of Human Rights, said: The substance of the double jeopardy principle is the protection of an individual from legal action for offences for which the person was already adjudicated.
6851) is used in a more extreme case of jeopardy than a regular jeopardy assessment, such as when the IRS suspects the taxpayer will flee the country In a termination assessment, the taxpayer's tax year is deemed to be terminated and treated as a completed tax year for the purposes of assessing the tax liability A termination assessment applies to the current tax year or the immediately preceding tax year if the tax return's due date has not yet passed.
"Would you let Watson be your doctor?" Etzioni pointed out that the Jeopardy
"If it helps dispel the idea that women aren't as good 'Jeopardy!' players as men, that would be great,'' she said.
Revere (2004), for example, suggests that playing Jeopardy in class improves student understanding and therefore course satisfaction, while Rotter (2004) suggests that such activities can benefit all students.
But due to the 800-year-old double jeopardy law, Dunlop could not be re-tried or brought back to court as the law stated someone could not be tried again for an offence they have already been cleared or convicted of.
Jeopardy! was created by businessman and entertainer Merv Griffin and first aired in 1964.
This collection of over a dozen essays explores philosophical themes and critical issues in the famous quiz-show, Jeopardy. They interrogate American exceptionalism in the show, cognitive inequality, what trivia really has to do with knowledge, what having information at our finger-tips does to our memories, what makes Jeopardy a good game, the possibility of artificial intelligence, and more.
Besides higher license fees, a disadvantage to both "Wheel" and "Jeopardy" is that they attract older viewers, which makes them less attractive to advertisers.
In holding that the Double Jeopardy Clause does not prohibit retrial of a defendant who was essentially acquitted on a greater charge when the jury deadlocked on lesser-included charges, the Supreme Court has directly contradicted the Double Jeopardy Clause's function of protecting defendants from repeated prosecutions by the State for the same offense.