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Inventory

For companies: Raw materials, items available for sale or in the process of being made ready for sale. They can be individually valued by several different means, including cost or current market value, and collectively by FIFO (First in, first out), LIFO (Last in, first out) or other techniques. The lower value of alternatives is usually used to preclude overstating earnings and assets. For securities firms: Securities bought and held by a broker or dealer for their own account.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Inventory

The raw materials and the products made from them that a company possesses and intends to sell in short order. It also includes raw materials that are in the process of being made into a final product. Inventory is considered an asset on a balance sheet, but because it comes with costs (such as storage and spoilage), most companies seek to find a balance between having too much inventory, which comes with these costs, and too little, which could result in the company not filling orders for the product. Inventory may be accounted on a last-in-first-out or a first-in-first-out basis, which each has advantages and disadvantages. See also: Just-in-Time, Just-in-Case.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

inventory

The amount of raw materials, work in process, and finished goods being held for sale at a given time. Diamonds held by a jeweler, engines owned by General Motors, and canned and frozen foods in a grocery store chain's warehouse are examples of inventory. Inventory is generally the least liquid item listed by a firm in the current asset account of its balance sheet. See also beginning inventory, ending inventory.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

inventory

the STOCKS of finished goods, WORK IN PROGRESS and raw materials held by businesses. See INVENTORY INVESTMENT, STOCKHOLDING COSTS.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

inventory

the STOCKS of finished goods, WORK-IN-PROGRESS and raw materials held by businesses. See INVENTORY INVESTMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

inventory

(1) The total listings controlled by a real estate broker.(2) The total property for sale or lease in a defined area.(3) Property held for sale in the ordinary course of business or to be used in the manufacture of goods held for sale.(4) An itemized listing of personal property.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Inventory

For income tax purposes, inventory consists of items acquired for sale to customers in the regular course of a taxpayer's trade or business.
Copyright © 2008 H&R Block. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission from H&R Block Glossary
References in periodicals archive ?
Han, Dresner, and Windle (2008) use data from 19 three-digit US manufacturing sectors from 2002 to 2005 from the US Economic Census and the Annual Survey of Manufacturers (ASM) to investigate the impact of global sourcing and exports on US domestic manufacturing inventories. They conclude that global sourcing and exports have increased US domestic raw materials and finished goods inventories.
In conclusion, I would like to quote the comment given by Hal Mather in his book, How to really manage Inventories. The comment was: All inventory Management is exactly wrong.
In March 1999, Saudi Arabia led the organization in a program to reduce consumer inventories across the globe.
The aggregate change in inventories this year will contribute negatively to growth in demand by the equivalent of 0.2 percent of GDP.
Tables 1, 2, and 3 show chain-weighted quarterly and monthly estimates of real inventories, sales, and I-S ratios, respectively.(2) Table 4 shows manufacturing inventories by stage of fabrication.
Step 6: Customer inventories are continuously monitored and additional product shipped as needed (based on customer-specified maximum/minimum levels).
The addition of 334,226 square feet of new inventories translated to total net absorption of 457,014 square feet.
This resulted in a pileup of inventories. If the slowdown in aggregate demand was expected to continue, production would be cut back not only to bring output in line with the new lower level of expected demand, but also to run down the undesirably high level of inventory holdings.
"You want to collect your receivables and turn your inventories as fast as possible and pay your payables as slowly as possible without incurring any penalties."
Economists continue to explore the idea that large unexpected slowdowns in demand may cause an excessive amount of inventory to build up, causing a slowdown in output as firms cut back on production until inventories return to normal.
The faulty inventories can hurt public and polluter alike, he argues, if they lead to costly process- or pollution-control changes that provide little smog relief.
But a growing number of PC-based software packages can save you from another sort of maintenance drudgery - the endless documentation of maintenance schedules, spare-parts inventories, and repair costs.