invention

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invention

see RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.

invention

the creation of new production techniques and processes and new products that can be developed into usable processes and products through INNOVATION. Invention is an important means for a firm to improve its competitive position over rival suppliers by enabling it to lower supply costs and prices to consumers and to provide consumers with improved products. These benefits also improve overall MARKET PERFORMANCE. Certain kinds of MARKET STRUCTURE may be more conducive to invention insofar as they offer better incentives and resources for undertaking RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (see MONOPOLY for further discussion).

In a more general way, invention can add to the growth of national income and output (see ECONOMIC GROWTH) by the qualitative improvement of a country's CAPITAL STOCK as investment in new technologies improves PRODUCTIVITY. See TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESSIVENESS, PATENT.

References in periodicals archive ?
audiences then use "Oba-Mao" as an inventional rhetorical resource for political discourses.
In the rhetorical tradition, imitation is recognized as a generative, inventional resource that allows an individual to "take experience apart and put it together in new ways" (Corbett 1971, 250).
Topics include the role of the late William Norwood Brigance (also of Wabash College) in advancing the understanding of democracy and rhetoric, the possible contributions of classical and neo-classical traditions of rhetorical theory in advancing public deliberation, the potentials of rhetorical pedagogy in Lithuania, race and gender in the US presidential campaign rhetoric of 2004, the institutional contexts of rhetorical production and their influence on policy formation in the US government, and the role of rhetoric as an inventional resource in civil society.
Inspiring rhetoric stands in need of inspirational inventional moments.
After it became clear that some sort of non-revolutionary procedure would be pursued by the candidates and the campaigns, the metaphrand characteristics of two political competitors and their supporters working for advantage in a multi-faceted, conflict-filled, circumstance encouraged the inventional selection of sports, war, and contest metaphiers and paraphiers.
Richard Leo Enos's "Inventional Constraints on the Technographers of Ancient Athents: A Study of Kairos," brings to the foreground how the history of technology is often an essential component to humanistic inquires of the past, although the essay is rendered less enjoyable than it otherwise could be by some awkward rhetorical constructions--for example, "We regularly ask, 'What time is it?' but we never seem to ask, 'What is time?' Or, more to the point, 'What did time mean to ancient Athenian rhetors?'" (79).
3, p.13; Christine Oravec, 'An Inventional Archaeology of "A Fable for Tomorrow,"' in Waddell, ed., And No Birds Sing, pp.
(6) Being self-reflexive means being aware of and accounting tot the choices one makes in the inventional and writing processes (see Nothstine, Blair and Copeland (1994) for examples).
(23.) Ingrid Bartsch makes this point about science and rhetoric as she summarizes the work of Donna Haraway, who "echoes a pre-Platonic notion of rhetoric in which tropes and topoi are inventional systems and not simply databases used to store and retrieve information":
See "An Inventional Archaeology of 'A Fable for Tomorrow,'" in And No Birds Sing: Rhetorical Analyses of Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring," ed.
The disclaimer at the end of the sentence identifies a reciprocity between the inventional capacity and human social need, a dialectic between the creative and the material: "Even the metaphor, that figurative transfer of meaning, stands in the service of satisfying urgent needs" (p.
(The Rhetorica adHerennium is a case in point.) Memory served as 'the epistemological place where the inventional materials of torture were assembled (dispositio) and rehearsed for performance (actio)' (61).