interrogatories

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interrogatories

A set of written questions by one party in a lawsuit to another party in the lawsuit,which must be answered under oath.

References in periodicals archive ?
interrogatory speaks to an element of the offense).
a nonuniform interrogatory will be counted as its own interrogatory.
According to the appellate court, Fred answered the interrogatory as follows: Lynne Hafley, Fidelity Investments, Fidelity Rollover IRA, $31,067.83.
Blanket objections--in which the responding party prefaces its interrogatory responses with "general" and "specific" objections--are improper.
Artistic discourse, as an interrogatory realm for emotions and ideas, provides the perfect analytical lens through which to consider developments in contemporary culture; and, in turn, looking back through culture compellingly illuminates questions long important to artists, art historians, and critics.
In her characteristically interrogatory style, Fuchs contemplates the meaning of this racially fraught role-playing, whereby Indians (by the year 1570, no doubt baptized Christians) figure the infidel: "If the Indians can represent the Muslims, have the Spaniards in fact succeeded in their evangelical mission?
For all his extended French sojourn, he claims to have failed to master the language, but he still punctuates every third English sentence with an interrogatory "Oui?"
(129) Finally, a well-reasoned response to such an interrogatory may convince the infringer of the strength of the patent claimant's case and hence encourage settlement of the dispute.
The convenient interrogatory menu driven programming system is retained but now a new touch screen graphical interface offers increased on screen set-up capability and easier programming of an unlimited number of hole patterns.
Apart from the author's occasional interrogatory appearance and one or two paragraphs from the subject's mum, Touch this Earth Lightly is comprised almost exclusively of transcripts from the 1982 interviews for Drew's first Murcutt monograph, Leaves of Iron (1985).
Having endless times been asked, by schoolmasters, military cadet instructors and other purveyors of the literal and banal: "Look here, Hitchens, what would happen if everyone thought like you?" I came across Yossarian's riposte to this eternal interrogatory (which was roughly, Why, then, I'd be a damn fool to think any other way, wouldn't I?) and sent the book hurtling skywards with a yell of triumph.
The first section narrates the history of the individual and his crime which led to the case, analyzes the prior law of confession, and discusses the extent to which police have developed interrogatory practices which make Miranda's warnings requirement irrelevant.