interlocking directorates


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Interlocking Directorates

A situation or state in which one person is a member of the board of directors in more than one publicly-traded company. This creates the possibility of a conflict of interest; indeed, interlocking directorates are illegal when two companies are competitors.

interlocking directorates

Boards of directors of different firms that have one or more of the same people serving as directors. Interlocking directorates are illegal among competing firms.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Analysis, Critique, and Assessment of Research on Interlocking Directorates." Annual Review of Sociology 22:271-98.
An analysis, critique, and assessment of research on interlocking directorates. Annual Review of Sociology, 22: 271-298.
Piedalue (1976) employed the same approach in mapping the bank-centred network of interlocking directorates between 1900 and 1930.
Indeed, an interlocking directorate situation, which exists today, may not at all be intended to restrict or lessen competition.
interlocking directorates. Section III.B then introduces the Maximum
While the former analyzes the structures of capital networks and interlocking directorates between the economies' largest enterprises, the latter focuses on the view of networks as systems of interpersonal relations between the most important economic leaders.
One result of these features is the pervasiveness of interlocking directorates between corporations and the government in emerging economies.
Networks of interlocking directorates are one of the principal concerns of corporate power structure research.
In any event, the committee found evidence that there was a conspiracy it called the Money Trust: "An established and well-defined identity and community of interest between a few leaders of finance which has been created and is held together through stock holdings, interlocking directorates, and other forms of domination over banks, trust companies, railroads, public service and industrial corporations, and which resulted in a vast and growing concentration of control of money and credit in the hands of a comparatively few men...."