intangibles


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Related to intangibles: Intangible assets, assets

Intangible Asset

In accounting, any asset that cannot be seen or touched. Intangible assets include things like patents and brand recognition, which add value to a company, but are difficult to price. Intangible assets explicitly do not include actual things, such as widgets, a widget factory, or the land upon which the widget factory is built. Because of the difficulty in pricing, intangible assets are sometimes not included in a company's valuation. However, not including them may not express the company's true value. See also: Tangible assets.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

intangibles

costs and benefits usually associated with an INVESTMENT project that either cannot be quantified or that can be quantified but cannot easily be valued in money terms. Examples of the former include the scenic effects of projects such as airport runways in rural areas; examples of the latter might include reductions in accident deaths associated with road-building projects, which give problems setting a money value per life saved. Such intangibles are important although they cannot easily be incorporated into an investment appraisal. See COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Capitalism without Capital concludes by presenting three possible scenarios for what the future of an intangible world might be like, and by outlining how managers, investors, and policymakers can exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow their businesses, portfolios, and economies.
This middle section of the book closes out with chapters on how intangibles change the nature of the infrastructure debate and on the challenge of financing an intangible focused economy.
For businesses producing intangibles (say software or design work), managers need to keep information flowing up and down throughout the organization because employees will know a lot that managers will not.
* Fifth, market size is critical, because intangibles (such as Starbucks' brand or Facebook's software) can be "scaled up" more or less indefinitely.
Whereas with the intangible risks, they typically don't have the legacy attached to them, so if you're trying to underwrite them there's a lot less to extrapolate forward because data about the intangibles just hasn't been around very long.
Intangibles create more spillovers than tangible capital because they tend to be much less excludable.
482 definition of intangibles to include goodwill, going concern value, and workforce in place.
Given those presented in this article, we consider that intangibles assets research is still in the formulation of fundamental theories.
The sourcing of receipts from the rental, lease, or license of intangible property to business customers is based on the location in which the intangible is used.
(SVP)" (1) Based on this definition, the present value of anything is intangible because it is a theoretical concept of worth.