intangibility


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Related to intangibility: heterogeneity

Intangibility

The state in which an asset cannot be seen or touched. Intangible assets include things like patents and brand recognition, which add value to a company, but are difficult to price. Intangibility explicitly does not include actual things, such as widgets, a widget factory, or the land upon which the widget factory is built. Because of the difficulty in pricing, intangible assets are sometimes not included in a company's valuation. However, not including them may not express the company's true value. See also: Tangible assets.

intangibility

a characteristic of most SERVICES (for example, window cleaning, legal advice etc.) that reflects the inability of a customer to see, touch, taste or smell the service. Contrast GOOD.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some scholars point out the vital characteristics, such as; intangibility, inseparability, heterogeneity, perishability and ownership that extricate the service industry from other industries.
The results indicated that gap exists between expectation and perception of student's intangibility, reliability, responsiveness, and assurance dimensions of SERVQUAL model.
The degree of intangibility provides a way to classify services firms as "pure" or "non-pure", depending on the amount of tangible or intangible elements embedded in their activities (Shostack, 1977).
'The world is witnessing a paradigm shift and the economy is shifting towards intangibility.' The value and importance of tangible assets such as stock and real estate have declined, the incredible value surge of intellectual property (IP) has defied the old laws of economics, and basic IP rights such as copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, and patents now account for almost 80 percent of corporate value.
It manipulates information, which is intangible, but intangibility is not the distinguishing characteristic of soft power.
Specifically, service advertising strategies have been developed to address the unique characteristics of services: intangibility, heterogeneity, perishability and ownership issues (Mortimer, 2002); that had let to Hill and Gandhi (1992) categorically putting forth that services requiring special and specific advertising treatments (Naidu, 2017) Services advertising has seen various managerial frameworks developed by George and Berry, 1981, Hill and Gandhi, 1992 and Mittal, 1991(Mortimer, 2002).
He finds certain intangibility in their solid state which allows him to give them an artsy look that in turn helps him treat them as living objects.
These challenges arise because of the variability in customer demands and expectations, simultaneity in production and consumption and the intangibility in the service delivered whose quality cannot be tested before consumption and can only be perceived by the customer.
In many existing studies the digital product's intangibility shapes the perceived risk, as our findings also demonstrate.
Rethinking Intangibility as a Limit on Patent-Eligibility.
For them, different studies have sought to measure the existence of information asymmetry and, as information risk cannot be measured directly, it has been utilized different proxies, such as market-to-book, volatility, intangibility and beta.
Each country in the region also listed sites for future possible inscription as well as cultural practices, which UNESCO categorises as 'intangible cultural heritage'--even though intangibility does not preclude commercialisation.