Herd Instinct

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Herd Instinct

A sociological phenomenon in which everyone does what everyone else seems to be doing. In investing, the herd instinct is seen most commonly in panic sells and rallies that occur without regard for broader indicators. That is, regardless of the sustainability of a rally or the overreaction of the sell-off, the concept of a herd instinct suggests that traders will continue to follow the trend until contrary evidence becomes overwhelming (or simply until they calm down). See also: Behavioral economics, Crowd.
References in classic literature ?
Again as in the case of corporeal structure, and conformably with my theory, the instinct of each species is good for itself, but has never, as far as we can judge, been produced for the exclusive good of others.
The possibility, or even probability, of inherited variations of instinct in a state of nature will be strengthened by briefly considering a few cases under domestication.
It is now commonly admitted that the more immediate and final cause of the cuckoo's instinct is, that she lays her eggs, not daily, but at intervals of two or three days; so that, if she were to make her own nest and sit on her own eggs, those first laid would have to be left for some time unincubated, or there would be eggs and young birds of different ages in the same nest.
The occasional habit of birds laying their eggs in other birds' nests, either of the same or of a distinct species, is not very uncommon with the Gallinaceae; and this perhaps explains the origin of a singular instinct in the allied group of ostriches.
207-9) gives a good illustration of an instinct growing wiser through experience.
(1) That instinct requires no prevision of the biological end which it serves;
(2) That instinct is only adapted to achieve this end in the usual circumstances of the animal in question, and has no more precision than is necessary for success AS A RULE;
(3) That processes initiated by instinct often come to be performed better after experience;
You should always pay attention to your instincts."
"You see," he said sadly, " you have no instincts."
He believes, partly on the basis of intellectual reasoning, but mainly on what seems to him the convincing testimony of instinct, that the universe is controlled by a loving God, who has made life primarily a thing of happiness for man.
Rossetti's poetry is absolutely unlike that of any other English poet, and the difference is clearly due in large part to his Italian race and his painter's instinct. He has, in the didactic sense, absolutely no religious, moral, or social interests; he is an artist almost purely for art's sake, writing to give beautiful embodiment to moods, experiences, and striking moments.