Long Term

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Related to insomnia: Fatal insomnia

Long Term

Describing a plan, strategy, security, or anything else with a term of longer than one year. The exact number of years varies according to the usage. For example, a long term financial plan outlines investment and other financial goals for any time more than one fiscal year, while a long term bond has a maturity of 10 or more years. Anything long term involves more uncertainty than anything short term because, generally speaking, market trends are more easily predictable in the short term. Thus, while planning for the long term is necessary, one's plan must be flexible to account for its inherent uncertainty.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 11, 2018-Idorsia starts registration of Phase 3 insomnia programme
"Recent studies have shown up to 20 per cent of the population suffers from bouts of insomnia. Teenagers are affected a lot more than before because of smart devices.
Chronic insomnia has more causes than the acute form, such as changes in the environment, clinical disorders, medications and unhealthy habits.
Patients and Methods: In the current study, data of 200 insomnia patients were collected by scales including Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Health Status Questionnaire (SF-36) through purposive sampling technique.
Around a third of Brits have insomnia and it affects military veterans in larger numbers.
People love to tout melatonin as the holistic answer to insomnia. After all, it's a naturally occurring hormone.
Insomnia - Therapeutics under Development by Companies 12
Methods: 40 patients with insomnia (insomnia group) and 48 normal sleepers (control group) were tested using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), episodic memory test, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA).
It is well established that insomnia in older adults is associated with increased cardiovascular risk.
However, men but not women who reported having more than one insomnia symptom had a 39% increased risk of a cardiovascular event for each additional symptom.
Applegate had talked to her doctor in the past, but only recently learned about the two systems in the brain that regulate sleep, and how a problem with the wake and sleep systems may contribute to insomnia. Now, she is encouraging others to visit WhySoAwake.com to get facts about insomnia and start a new dialogue with their health care providers about what might be keeping them awake.
Insomnia is a sleep disorder in which people have difficulty falling or staying asleep.